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The rotating updraft base of a supercell thunderstorm, and a rear flank downdraft containing rain and hail, backlit by the setting sun, on May 10, 2014, in Climax, Kansas, United States. To most of us, dark clouds on the horizon usually means rain – but here in Kansas, they can also signal the start of a supercell. The huge formations, also known as rotating thunderstorms, are among the most powerful weather phenomenon found over land. (Photo by Stephen Locke/Barcroft Media)

The rotating updraft base of a supercell thunderstorm, and a rear flank downdraft containing rain and hail, backlit by the setting sun, on May 10, 2014, in Climax, Kansas, United States. To most of us, dark clouds on the horizon usually means rain – but here in Kansas, they can also signal the start of a supercell. The huge formations, also known as rotating thunderstorms, are among the most powerful weather phenomenon found over land. They can occur anywhere where the conditions are right, but are normally found in more arid climates. These awe-inspiring supercells were captured south of Climax city by storm chaser Stephen Locke. (Photo by Stephen Locke/Barcroft Media)
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18 Jul 2014 12:01:00
“Stacked Supercell with Lightning”. This huge mesocyclone supercell was near the Nebraska / Kansas border on the night of June 22nd, 2012. What a stunning structure! (Photo and caption by Jennifer Brindley/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)

“Stacked Supercell with Lightning”. This huge mesocyclone supercell was near the Nebraska / Kansas border on the night of June 22nd, 2012. What a stunning structure! (Photo and caption by Jennifer Brindley/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)

ATTENTION! All pictures are presented in high resolution. To see Hi-Res images – just TWICE click on any picture. In other words, click small picture – opens the BIG picture. Click BIG picture – opens VERY BIG picture.
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25 Jun 2013 13:12:00
A picturesque supercell formation in the northwest of Booker, Texas from June 2013. (Photo by Mike Olbinski/Barcroft Media)

A picturesque supercell formation in the northwest of Booker, Texas from June 2013. (Photo by Mike Olbinski/Barcroft Media)
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24 Apr 2014 10:25:00
A huge supercell dominates the Texas skyline like an atomic bomb explosion on April 11, 2015 in Lubbock, Texas. A huge supercell dominates the Texas skyline like an atomic bomb explosion. These incredible images were taken on April 11th, by photographer Darin Kuntz who has spent in his entire life in so-called Tornado Alley. And Darin confirmed that he snapped the storm standing in his backyard in Lubbock, Texas. (Photo by Darin Kuntz/Barcroft Media)

A huge supercell dominates the Texas skyline like an atomic bomb explosion on April 11, 2015 in Lubbock, Texas. A huge supercell dominates the Texas skyline like an atomic bomb explosion. These incredible images were taken on April 11th, by photographer Darin Kuntz who has spent in his entire life in so-called Tornado Alley. And Darin confirmed that he snapped the storm standing in his backyard in Lubbock, Texas. (Photo by Darin Kuntz/Barcroft Media)
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29 Jul 2015 11:44:00
A supercell that spawned a tornado earlier makes it was east north of McLean, Texas  on April 16, 2015 in Texas, United States. (Photo by Mike Olbinski/Barcroft Media)

A supercell that spawned a tornado earlier makes it was east north of McLean, Texas on April 16, 2015 in Texas, United States. Huge hail, terrifying lighting and giant supercells the size of buildings – these incredible images depict a year in the life of a storm chaser. Shot in 2015 by photographer Mike Olbinski, 40, this series of pictures show both the beautiful and the extreme nature of weather in the United States. (Photo by Mike Olbinski/Barcroft Media)
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23 Dec 2015 08:06:00
The Big Cloud: The Lovely Monster by Camille Seaman

“Award-winning photographer Camille Seaman, best known for her earlier work depicting massive polar icebergs, recently turned her lens on another incredible natural phenomenon - storm clouds above the American Midwest. She partnered with experienced storm chasers and began to stalk a particular type of storm cloud – the supercell. On June 22, 2012, in western Nebraska, she encountered an enormous supercell and captured its many faces”. (Photo by Camille Seaman via TheAtlantic)
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17 Jul 2012 07:26:00
A supercell thunderstorm develops, May 8, 2017 in Elbert County outside of Limon, Colorado. With funding from the National Science Foundation and other government grants, scientists and meteorologists from the Center for Severe Weather Research try to get close to supercell storms and tornadoes trying to better understand tornado structure and strength, how low-level winds affect and damage buildings, and to learn more about tornado formation and prediction. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A supercell thunderstorm develops, May 8, 2017 in Elbert County outside of Limon, Colorado. With funding from the National Science Foundation and other government grants, scientists and meteorologists from the Center for Severe Weather Research try to get close to supercell storms and tornadoes trying to better understand tornado structure and strength, how low-level winds affect and damage buildings, and to learn more about tornado formation and prediction. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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16 Jun 2017 06:20:00
Supercell in Minnesota, near Browerville, Minnesota in 2014. (Photo by Camille Seaman/Caters News)

These stunning images show the phwoar-some power of some of Americas most extreme weather. Camille Seaman’s wondrous work features huge super cells, crashing lightning and gale-force winds. The roaming photographer has chased storms across the US from Iowa to Wyoming and from Minnesota to Texas. Her favorite places to chase are Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota – notorious hotspots for spectacular storms. Here: Supercell in Minnesota, near Browerville, Minnesota in 2014. (Photo by Camille Seaman/Caters News)
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26 Jan 2015 12:10:00