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True Friendship


Lucky & Susi Photos by Tina M.
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29 Jun 2012 02:14:00
Is it a leaf? Is it tree bark? No, it’s the Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Cleverly disguised as a rotting leaf, Madagascar’s camouflage king has red eyes, pointy horns and a taste for night hunting: it’s nature’s most devilish deceiver. (Photo by Thomas Marent/ARDEA)

Is it a leaf? Is it tree bark? No, it’s the Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Cleverly disguised as a rotting leaf, Madagascar’s camouflage king has red eyes, pointy horns and a taste for night hunting: it’s nature’s most devilish deceiver. The twisted body and veiny skin echo the detail of a dry leaf, which ensures the gecko blends in with its forest home. The mottled tail appears to have sections missing, as though it has withered over time. This mini-monster epitomises survival of the fittest, having adapted gradually to become today’s extraordinary leaf impersonator. (Photo by Thomas Marent/ARDEA)
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20 Nov 2015 08:03:00
True Friendship Pat Two

Russian cat and Russian dog are true friends, just look at them.


SEE ALSO:True Friendship
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22 Oct 2012 09:53:00
New York Police Department  tactical police officers stand guard near the New York Stock Exchange

New York Police Department tactical police officers stand guard near the New York Stock Exchange on September 9, 2011 in New York City. Officials are stepping up security in New York and Washington D.C. a day after U.S. officials received a credible but unconfirmed terror threat to utilize car bombs on bridges or tunnels in New York or Washington. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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10 Sep 2011 11:13:00
An African giant pouched rat sniffs for traces of landmine explosives at APOPO's training facility in Morogoro on June 17, 2016. (Photo by Carl De Souza/AFP Photo)

An African giant pouched rat sniffs for traces of landmine explosives at APOPO's training facility in Morogoro on June 17, 2016. APOPO trains the rats to detect both tuberculosis and landmines at its facility. Every year landmines kill or maim thousands of people worldwide. The trained rats sniff for explosive and so are able to detect the presence of landmines far faster than conventional methods which involve metal detection. (Photo by Carl De Souza/AFP Photo)
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19 Jun 2016 09:52:00
APOPO’s Training Center, situated on Sokoine Univeristy of Agriculture (SUA) in Tanzania, was established in 2000 to accommodate training and testing of mine detection rats in near-to-real conditions. Rats learn to look for mines

“APOPO’s Training Center, situated on Sokoine Univeristy of Agriculture (SUA) in Tanzania, was established in 2000 to accommodate training and testing of mine detection rats in near-to-real conditions”. – APOPO

Photo: MDR (Mine Detection Rat) learn to look for mines. (Photo by APOPO's HeroRATs)


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28 Feb 2013 14:08:00
A mine detection rat is given banana as a reward after successfully identifying an inactive mine on July 2, 2015 in Siem Reap, Cambodia. (Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images)

A mine detection rat is given banana as a reward after successfully identifying an inactive mine on July 2, 2015 in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC) working with the Belgian NGO APOPO has recently begun testing the feasability of using large mine detection rats from Tanzania to help clear fields of mines and unexploded ordnance in one of the most bombed and mined countries in the world. (Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images)
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03 Jul 2015 13:31:00
Dramatic changes spotted in HD 189733b exoplanet atmosphere

This artist's rendering illustrates the evaporation of HD 189733b's atmosphere in response to a powerful eruption from its host star. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope detected the escaping gases and NASA's Swift satellite caught the stellar flare. (Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)
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29 Jun 2012 09:45:00