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A rat's head rests as it is constricted in an opening in the bottom of a garbage can in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., October 18, 2016. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

A rat's head rests as it is constricted in an opening in the bottom of a garbage can in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., October 18, 2016. The Brooklyn rat was saved on Tuesday after getting its head stuck in the dumpster while scavenging for food, according to the New York Daily News. As the rat was scurrying around the bottom of the trash can, it came across a few ventilation holes. The hungry creature poked his head into one of them, but to its dismay couldn't get back out,Reuters photographer Lucas Jackson told the Daily News. Jackson was able to take some adorable photos of the rat's unfortunate situation before it was rescued. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)
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19 Oct 2016 12:26:00
A rat being trained by the Cambodian Mine Action Centre (CMAC) is pictured on an inactive landmine field in Siem Reap province July 9, 2015. Gambian pouched rats were deployed to Cambodia from Tanzania in April by a Belgian non-profit organization, APOPO, to help clear mines. (Photo by Samrang Pring/Reuters)

A rat being trained by the Cambodian Mine Action Centre (CMAC) is pictured on an inactive landmine field in Siem Reap province July 9, 2015. Gambian pouched rats were deployed to Cambodia from Tanzania in April by a Belgian non-profit organization, APOPO, to help clear mines. They've been trained since they were 4 weeks old. Cambodia is still littered with landmines after emerging from decades of civil war, including the 1970s Khmer Rough “Killing Fields” genocide, leaving it with one of the world's highest disability rates. APOPO has used the rodents for mine-clearing projects in several countries, including Angola, Mozambique, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam. (Photo by Samrang Pring/Reuters)
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14 Jul 2015 13:35:00
APOPO’s Training Center, situated on Sokoine Univeristy of Agriculture (SUA) in Tanzania, was established in 2000 to accommodate training and testing of mine detection rats in near-to-real conditions. Rats learn to look for mines

“APOPO’s Training Center, situated on Sokoine Univeristy of Agriculture (SUA) in Tanzania, was established in 2000 to accommodate training and testing of mine detection rats in near-to-real conditions”. – APOPO

Photo: MDR (Mine Detection Rat) learn to look for mines. (Photo by APOPO's HeroRATs)


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28 Feb 2013 14:08:00
Bug the Rat by Jessica Florence

Jessica Florence is a aspiring photographer who take shots of her pets in a very cute manner. She does a great job humanizing the rats, giving them a lovable personality.
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10 Oct 2012 09:02:00
Rats

Trained by Dutch photographer Ellen van Deelen to hold different musical instruments and pose for the camera, the Roosendaal Rats are considered very talented by their owner. She confesses rats weren’t exactly her favorite creatures, but, after buying these two, she realized they are highly intelligent creatures.

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18 Jul 2012 11:49:00