Loading...
Done
A golden eagle grabs a flying drone during a military training exercise at Mont-de-Marsan French Air Force base, Southwestern France, February 10, 2017. (Photo by Regis Duvignau/Reuters)

A golden eagle grabs a flying drone during a military training exercise at Mont-de-Marsan French Air Force base, Southwestern France, February 10, 2017. (Photo by Regis Duvignau/Reuters)
Details
12 Feb 2017 00:04:00
A Kazakh hunter has taken an eaglet from the nest, given it pride of place in their home and trained it. All hunters describe the eagle as part of their family. (Photo by Palani Mohan)

Kazakh nomads have been grazing their livestock in Mongolia for hundreds of years. Fascinated by the bond between hunter and eagle, photographer Palani Mohan has spent the last few years documenting the burkitshi. Mohan's photos of the landscape, isolation of the hunt, and most of all the trusting relationship between man and bird, convey the importance that the eagle plays in their lives. (Photo by Palani Mohan)
Details
11 Jan 2016 08:03:00
He said: "The photos were taken during the 17th Golden Eagle Festival in the Bayan-Ulgii province in Altai Mountains of Western Mongolia and the festival is just amazing”. (Photo by Batzaya Choijiljav/Caters News)

With their wings at full length, these beautiful golden eagles soar through the skies in a glorious training session to hunt their prey. Others sit on the arms of their owners and trainers. Batzaya Choijiljav, 41, from Mongolia has taken these magnificent pictures at the annual traditional Kazakhs festival, October 2015. (Photo by Batzaya Choijiljav/Caters News)
Details
06 Nov 2015 08:04:00
In one of the planet’s most desolate and harsh terrains, the Altai Mountains which run from Siberia in Russia down to Mongolia’s Gobi Desert, hunting with eagles is currently only practiced by a handful of Kyrgyz and Kazakhs. This form of falconry, the practice of hunting with the aid of birds of prey, can be traced back as far as 4,000 years in Central Asia. (Photo by Tariq Zaidi/The Washington Post)

In one of the planet’s most desolate and harsh terrains, the Altai Mountains which run from Siberia in Russia down to Mongolia’s Gobi Desert, hunting with eagles is currently only practiced by a handful of Kyrgyz and Kazakhs. This form of falconry, the practice of hunting with the aid of birds of prey, can be traced back as far as 4,000 years in Central Asia. Here: after a successful hunt, a proud hunter rewards his eagle by feeding it the lungs of the prey, which is considered the most highly prized part of the animal. (Photo by Tariq Zaidi/The Washington Post)
Details
22 Aug 2015 12:46:00
Hunter Berek and his eagle outside his home. (Photo by Brad Ruoho/The Star Tribune)

“I’d come to the Altai Mountains on an Adventure Sherpas tour. Our group of 12 was made up mostly of Minnesotans who’d left warm weather and falling leaves for frosty Mongolia. We’d come to sleep in cozy ger tents, the traditional yurt abode of the Mongolian steppe; sip mare’s milk tea; climb mountain glaciers; ride horses to an ancient battle site, and attend the annual Eagle Hunting Festival in Ölgiy...”. – Kathryn Kysar via The Star Tribune. Here: hunter Berek and his eagle outside his home. (Photo by Brad Ruoho/The Star Tribune)
Details
11 Jan 2015 12:57:00
13 year old Irka Bolen with his eagle. Tradition wise, when a boy turns 13, then are strong enough to hold the weight of a fully grown eagle. (Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News)

These stunning photographs show the changing face of a majestic centuries old Kazakh pastime tradition that still lives in the lands of mongolia – eagle hunters. Photo: 13 year old Irka Bolen with his eagle. Tradition wise, when a boy turns 13, then are strong enough to hold the weight of a fully grown eagle. (Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News)
Details
20 Apr 2014 10:33:00
Fine Horses And Fierce Eagles Are The wings Of The Kazakh

The Kazakhs are the descendants of Turkic, Mongolic and Indo-Iranian tribes and Huns that populated the territory between Siberia and the Black Sea. They are a semi-nomadic people and have roamed the mountains and valleys of western Mongolia with their herds since the 19th century. The ancient art of eagle hunting is one of many traditions and skills that the Kazakhs have, in recent decades, been able to hold on to. They rely on their clan and herds, believing in pre-Islamic cults of the sky, the ancestors, fire and the supernatural forces of good and evil spirits.
Details
20 Feb 2014 12:12:00