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Two holidaymakers amuse themselves with a porter's trolley whilst waiting for their train at Euston Station, London, 5th August 1939. (Photo by A. J. O'Brien/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

Two holidaymakers amuse themselves with a porter's trolley whilst waiting for their train at Euston Station, London, 5th August 1939. (Photo by A. J. O'Brien/Fox Photos/Getty Images)
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17 Apr 2017 07:48:00
“Priscilla”, 1969. He has described this image as one of his own favourites: “It expresses something about girlhood as well as something about a certain kind of maturity and experience”. It became the cover for Dinosaur Jr’s album Green Mind. (Photo by Joseph Szabo/Courtesy of Michael Hoppen Gallery/The Guardian)

Joseph Szabo was a frustrated high-school teacher in need of inspiration – so he started photographing his students, and captured all the angst and excitement of being caught between childhood and adulthood. Here: “Priscilla”, 1969. (Photo by Joseph Szabo/Courtesy of Michael Hoppen Gallery/The Guardian)
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16 Apr 2017 11:02:00
A publican serves a glass of stout to a donkey in the East End of London, 1960s. (Photo by Steve Lewis/Getty Images)

A publican serves a glass of stout to a donkey in the East End of London, 1960s. (Photo by Steve Lewis/Getty Images)
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12 Apr 2017 09:55:00
A U.S. Marine leads training on a shooting range in France in an undated photo taken during the First World War. (Photo by Reuters/Courtesy Library of Congress)

A U.S. Marine leads training on a shooting range in France in an undated photo taken during the First World War. (Photo by Reuters/Courtesy Library of Congress)
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10 Apr 2017 08:55:00
Alice Cooke at the Sydney Women’s Reformatory in 1922. By the time she was 24 Alice Cooke had created an impressive number of aliases and at least two husbands, and was convicted of bigamy and theft. (Photo by My Colorful Past/Mediadrumworld)

Alice Cooke at the Sydney Women’s Reformatory in 1922. By the time she was 24 Alice Cooke had created an impressive number of aliases and at least two husbands, and was convicted of bigamy and theft. (Photo by My Colorful Past/Mediadrumworld)
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17 Mar 2017 00:00:00
New York City Deputy Police Commissioner John A. Leach, right, watching agents pour liquor into sewer following a raid during the height of prohibition, circa 1921. (Photo by Tom Marshall/Mediadrumworld)

New York City Deputy Police Commissioner John A. Leach, right, watching agents pour liquor into sewer following a raid during the height of prohibition, circa 1921. (Photo by Tom Marshall/Mediadrumworld)
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15 Mar 2017 00:00:00
In this March 22, 1975 file photo, a refugee clutches a baby as a government helicopter gunship carries them away near Tuy Hoa, Vietnam, 235 miles northeast of Saigon. They were among thousands fleeing from Communist advances. (Photo by Nick Ut/AP Photo)

In this March 22, 1975 file photo, a refugee clutches a baby as a government helicopter gunship carries them away near Tuy Hoa, Vietnam, 235 miles northeast of Saigon. They were among thousands fleeing from Communist advances. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (Photo by Nick Ut/AP Photo)
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14 Mar 2017 00:02:00
The unromantic gypsies. Children boxing in a gypsy camp in Kent, England on July 1, 1951. Like all boys these gypsy lads like to try their hand at boxing. Encouraged by their friends they fight it out on Corke's Meadow. Few Romanies now live a life of wandering romance. Most are like the three hundred squatters of Corke's Meadow, Kent, which is part of a “gypsy problem” that involves about 100,000 today. Of those about 25,000 can be rightly called gypsies, the rest are Mumpers and Posh-rats and Hobos. Corke's Meadow has both kinds. “Picture Post” cameraman Bert Hardy photographs the Corke's Meadow gypsies in their encampment. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

The unromantic gypsies. Children boxing in a gypsy camp in Kent, England on July 1, 1951. Like all boys these gypsy lads like to try their hand at boxing. Encouraged by their friends they fight it out on Corke's Meadow. Few Romanies now live a life of wandering romance. Most are like the three hundred squatters of Corke's Meadow, Kent, which is part of a “gypsy problem” that involves about 100,000 today. Of those about 25,000 can be rightly called gypsies, the rest are Mumpers and Posh-rats and Hobos. Corke's Meadow has both kinds. “Picture Post” cameraman Bert Hardy photographs the Corke's Meadow gypsies in their encampment. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)
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12 Mar 2017 00:01:00