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North Kenya, Liboi.  A young Somali refugee crosses a field filled with marabous storks in July 1992. (Jean-Claude Coutausse)

North Kenya, Liboi. A young Somali refugee crosses a field filled with marabous storks in July 1992. (Photo by Jean-Claude Coutausse)
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08 Nov 2012 09:58:00
Somali security officers gather at the scene of a car bomb attack at the base for the African Union forces in Mogadishu, Somalia, 26 July 2016. Media reports say at least 10 people, including the security guards at the base which is located at Mogadishu's airport, have been killed after two car bombs exploded at the base. Somalia's Islamist militant group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the latest attack. (Photo by Said Yusuf Warsame/EPA)

Somali security officers gather at the scene of a car bomb attack at the base for the African Union forces in Mogadishu, Somalia, 26 July 2016. Media reports say at least 10 people, including the security guards at the base which is located at Mogadishu's airport, have been killed after two car bombs exploded at the base. Somalia's Islamist militant group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the latest attack. (Photo by Said Yusuf Warsame/EPA)
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27 Jul 2016 09:12:00
Abdulahi Yaroow, 13, smokes a cigarette while chewing khat at the same time in Mogadishu August 10, 2014. (Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters)

Abdulahi Yaroow, 13, smokes a cigarette while chewing khat at the same time in Mogadishu August 10, 2014. Grown on plantations in the highlands of Kenya and Ethiopia, tonnes of khat, or qat, dubbed “the flower of paradise” by its users, are flown daily into Mogadishu airport, to be distributed from there in convoys of lorries to markets across Somalia. Britain, whose large ethnic Somali community sustained a lucrative demand for the leaves, banned khat from July as an illegal drug. This prohibition jolted the khat market, creating a supply glut in Somalia and pushing down prices, to the delight of the many connoisseurs of its amphetamine-like high. (Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters)
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28 Aug 2014 10:35:00
Ali Asair, who has left his family behind and traveled hundreds of kilometers in search for a pasture for his animals, attends to his camel in a pastoralists' settlement in the Bandarbeyla district in Somalia's semi-autonomous region of Puntland, Somalia, 24 March 2017. According to media reports, the United Nations says only 31 percent of 864 million US dollars appeal for a drought-hit Somalia is funded. The UN said the world is facing the largest humanitarian crisis since 1945, adding that more than 20 million people are facing the threat of famine in Somalia, Yemen, South Sudan and Nigeria and 1.4 million children could die from starvation this year. (Photo by Dai Kurokawa/EPA)

Ali Asair, who has left his family behind and traveled hundreds of kilometers in search for a pasture for his animals, attends to his camel in a pastoralists' settlement in the Bandarbeyla district in Somalia's semi-autonomous region of Puntland, Somalia, 24 March 2017. According to media reports, the United Nations says only 31 percent of 864 million US dollars appeal for a drought-hit Somalia is funded. The UN said the world is facing the largest humanitarian crisis since 1945, adding that more than 20 million people are facing the threat of famine in Somalia, Yemen, South Sudan and Nigeria and 1.4 million children could die from starvation this year. (Photo by Dai Kurokawa/EPA)
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28 Mar 2017 09:01:00
Fishermen prepare fish from their vessels on the shores of the Gulf of Aden in the city of Bosasso, northern Somalia's breakaway Puntland region December 17, 2016. (Photo by Feisal Omar/Reuters)

Fishermen prepare fish from their vessels on the shores of the Gulf of Aden in the city of Bosasso, northern Somalia's breakaway Puntland region December 17, 2016. (Photo by Feisal Omar/Reuters)
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19 Dec 2016 06:59:00
In this photo taken Wednesday, March 8, 2017, a woman herder sits with her goats in a remote desert area near Bandar Beyla in Somalia's semiautonomous northeastern state of Puntland. Somalia has declared the drought a national disaster, part of what the United Nations calls the largest humanitarian crisis since the world body was founded in 1945, and with animals being central to many the drought threatens their main sources of nutrition and survival. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)

In this photo taken Wednesday, March 8, 2017, a woman herder sits with her goats in a remote desert area near Bandar Beyla in Somalia's semiautonomous northeastern state of Puntland. Somalia has declared the drought a national disaster, part of what the United Nations calls the largest humanitarian crisis since the world body was founded in 1945, and with animals being central to many the drought threatens their main sources of nutrition and survival. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)
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15 Mar 2017 00:03:00
People collect water from shallow wells dug along the Shabelle River bed, which is dry due to drought in Somalia's Shabelle region, March 19, 2016. The cabinet ministers of the federal republic of Somalia have held on Thursday their weekly meeting in Mogadishu and discussed on the drought situation in parts of the country and its humanitarian consequences. Chaired by the acting PM and justice minister Abdullah Ahmed Jama (Ilka-Jir), the cabinet noted with deep concern the the prevailing situation in Somalia, with one of the worst ever drought in two decades. (Photo by Feisal Omar/Reuters)

People collect water from shallow wells dug along the Shabelle River bed, which is dry due to drought in Somalia's Shabelle region, March 19, 2016. The cabinet ministers of the federal republic of Somalia have held on Thursday their weekly meeting in Mogadishu and discussed on the drought situation in parts of the country and its humanitarian consequences. Chaired by the acting PM and justice minister Abdullah Ahmed Jama (Ilka-Jir), the cabinet noted with deep concern the the prevailing situation in Somalia, with one of the worst ever drought in two decades. (Photo by Feisal Omar/Reuters)
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20 Mar 2016 11:38:00
A soldier from the African Union (AU) peacekeeping force stands guard at the site where a cargo plane carrying supplies for AU troops crash-landed outside Somalia's capital, on October 13, 2015 at Abirska, some 18 kilometres outside Somalian capital, Mogadishu. The officials said the Egyptian-owned transport plane went down after making several unsuccessful passes over the seafront airport. (Photo by Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP Photo)

A soldier from the African Union (AU) peacekeeping force stands guard at the site where a cargo plane carrying supplies for AU troops crash-landed outside Somalia's capital, on October 13, 2015 at Abirska, some 18 kilometres outside Somalian capital, Mogadishu. The officials said the Egyptian-owned transport plane went down after making several unsuccessful passes over the seafront airport. Two of the six crew members suffered light injuries in the crash, the officials said, but added that the plane and those on board were safe having landed in an area controlled by the Somali government and the African Union's AMISOM force. (Photo by Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP Photo)
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16 Oct 2015 08:02:00