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A Shariah law official whips a woman who is convicted of prostitution during a public caning outside a mosque in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, Friday, April 20, 2018. Indonesia's deeply conservative Aceh province on Friday caned several unmarried couples for showing affection in public and two women for prostitution before an enthusiastic audience of hundreds. The canings were possibly the last to be carried out before large crowds in Aceh after the province's governor announced earlier this month that the punishments would be moved indoors. (Photo by Heri Juanda/AP Photo)

A Shariah law official whips a woman who is convicted of prostitution during a public caning outside a mosque in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, Friday, April 20, 2018. Indonesia's deeply conservative Aceh province on Friday caned several unmarried couples for showing affection in public and two women for prostitution before an enthusiastic audience of hundreds. The canings were possibly the last to be carried out before large crowds in Aceh after the province's governor announced earlier this month that the punishments would be moved indoors. (Photo by Heri Juanda/AP Photo)
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23 Apr 2018 00:05:00
Matthias Broda, inventor and designer of the wooden e-bike, cycles a prototype along a street in Berlin, November 20, 2014. The wooden e-bike produced by German company Aceteam from ash wood, will be launched on the market by spring 2015 and will cost around 3,950 euro (4,950 dollars). The e-bike will be equipped with an 250W e-bike motor for a range of up to 100 kilometer  (62 miles) with a rechargeable battery. (Photo by Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)

Matthias Broda, inventor and designer of the wooden e-bike, cycles a prototype along a street in Berlin, November 20, 2014. The wooden e-bike produced by German company Aceteam from ash wood, will be launched on the market by spring 2015 and will cost around 3,950 euro (4,950 dollars). The e-bike will be equipped with an 250W e-bike motor for a range of up to 100 kilometer (62 miles) with a rechargeable battery. (Photo by Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)
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21 Nov 2014 13:02:00
An Acehnese women is whipped in front of the public for violating sharia law in Pidie District on 14 July 2017, Aceh, Indonesia. (Photo by Oviyandi/Barcroft Images)

An Acehnese women is whipped in front of the public for violating sharia law in Pidie District on 14 July 2017, Aceh, Indonesia. Aceh is the only one province in Indonesia which has implemented sharia law, which bans sexual contact between men and women who are not married. Whipping is one form of punishment imposed in Aceh for violating Islamic sharia law. (Photo by Oviyandi/Barcroft Images)
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15 Jul 2017 08:18:00
Serbian police officers of the Special Anti-Terrorist Unit pose for a picture in their base outside Belgrade October 8, 2014. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)

Serbian police officers of the Special Anti-Terrorist Unit pose for a picture in their base outside Belgrade October 8, 2014. When the killing of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman in Ferguson, Missouri, in August sparked sometimes violent protests, the response of police in camouflage gear and armoured vehicles wielding stun grenades and assault rifles seemed more like a combat operation than a public order measure. Some U.S. police departments have recently acquired U.S. military-surplus hardware from wars abroad, but there are many law enforcers around the world whose rules of engagement also allow the use of lethal force with relatively few restrictions. But for every regulation that gives police wide scope to use firearms, there is another code that sharply limits their use. In Serbia, police may use measures ranging from batons to special vehicles, water cannon and tear gas on groups of people who have gathered illegally and are behaving in a way that is violent or could cause violence, but they may use firearms only when life is endangered. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)
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27 Nov 2014 14:53:00
A Pokot girl, covered in animal skins, walks to a place where she will rest after being circumcised in a tribal ritual in a village about 80 kilometres from the town of Marigat in Baringo County, October 16, 2014. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)

Reuters photographer Siegfried Modola gained access to a circumcision ceremony in rural Kenya for young girls of the Pokot tribe, in Baringo County. Here: a Pokot girl, covered in animal skins, walks to a place where she will rest after being circumcised in a tribal ritual in a village about 80 kilometres from the town of Marigat in Baringo County, October 16, 2014. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)
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13 Nov 2014 14:12:00
A replica of the Wall-E character is remotely controlled with a mobile phone by Bolivian student Esteban Quispe, 17, in Patacamaya, south of La Paz, December 10, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A replica of the Wall-E character is remotely controlled with a mobile phone by Bolivian student Esteban Quispe, 17, in Patacamaya, south of La Paz, December 10, 2015. Quispe built the Wall-E robot using materials he obtained from a rubbish dump in the town located in the Andean highland region. He hopes to mechanize agriculture in Patacamaya by making use of robots that operate on solar energy, Quispe told Reuters. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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13 Dec 2015 08:05:00
Audi E-Bike Worthersee

One of the highlights on the Audi stand is the bicycle technology concept known as the Audi e-bike Wörthersee – a sport bike that does not fit into any of the usual categories. It is neither a pedelec nor a conventional bike, but is best described as a high-end pedelec made by Audi for sport, fun and tricks. The Audi e-bike Wörthersee combines the Audi brand’s principal competences – design, ultra, connect and e-tron – and explores the limits of what is technically feasible in terms of design, lightweight construction, networking and electric mobility.
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11 Jul 2014 11:34:00
“The sustainable development goals cannot be met unless waste management is addressed as a priority”, says UK waste management charity Waste Aid. “E-waste is one of the fastest growing categories of the 7-10bn tonnes of waste produced globally every year”, adds director Mike Webster. “In our view, decent waste management is a basic right and we want governments around the world take this issue much more seriously – in 2012 only 0.2% of international aid went on improving solid waste management – it’s just not enough”. (Photo by Kai Loeffelbein/laif Agentur)

Sustainable development goal target 12.5 is to reduce waste. But with a planet increasingly dependent on technology, is that even possible? As of today, over 30m tonnes of electronic waste has been thrown out so far this year, according to the World Counts. Most e-waste is sent to landfills in Asia and Africa where it is recycled by hand, exposing the people who do it to environmental hazards. Kai Loeffelbein’s photographs of e-waste recycling in Guiyu, southern China show what happens to discarded computers. (Photo by Kai Loeffelbein/laif Agentur)
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19 Oct 2016 12:14:00