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Saddle II. (Photo by Helmut Newton)

Vintage Newton, a pop-up exhibition of Helmut Newton prints from 1974-1984, opens in west London at the ONGallery. These prints, which feature Charlotte Rampling and Elsa Peretti, were produced from a series of transparencies that he considered his most provocative and important. Here: Saddle II. (Photo by Helmut Newton)
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26 Nov 2015 08:06:00
Fun Laws In America By Olivia Locher

Many laws still in existence throughout the united states are wildly outdated, rendering them completely ridiculous, useless and bizarre. The absurdity is illustrated by new York-based photographer Olivia Locher, who catalogs the crazy rules and regulations of each state in a playful photographic series ‘I fought the law’. Readers might be surprised to learn that in Rhode island, it is illegal to wear transparent clothing, nobody is allowed to ride a bicycle in a swimming pool in California and Arizona residents may not have more than two dildos in a house. Take a look at the ongoing series below to find out more about the peculiar oddities present in the American legal system.
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09 Jun 2014 11:36:00
Dorytomus

Dorytomus // Dorytomus sp. D. tremulae Size: 5 mm
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04 Jun 2012 13:57:00
Strange Children by John Seven

«My God! My Shoulder!», “Re-Gruntled”, 2011. (Photo by John Seven)
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07 Jul 2012 10:57:00
Photographers: Helmut Newton

“Newton was born in Berlin, the son of Klara “Claire” (Marquis) and Max Neustädter, a button factory owner. His family was Jewish. Newton attended the Heinrich-von-Treitschke-Realgymnasium and the American School in Berlin. Interested in photography from the age of 12 when he purchased his first camera, he worked for the German photographer Yva (Elsie Neulander Simon) from 1936. The increasingly oppressive restrictions placed on Jews by the Nuremberg laws meant that his father lost control of the factory in which he manufactured buttons and buckles; he was briefly interned in a concentration camp on “Kristallnacht”, November 9, 1938, which finally compelled the family to leave Germany. Newton's parents fled to South America. He was issued with a passport just after turning 18, and left Germany on December 5, 1938. At Trieste he boarded the “Conte Rosso” (along with about 200 others escaping the Nazis) intending to journey to China. After arriving in Singapore he found he was able to remain there, first and briefly as a photographer for the Straits Times and then as a portrait photographer”. – Wikipedia

Photo: Sigourney Weaver by Helmut Newton, 1995.
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08 Apr 2012 13:49:00
John Malkovich as Marilyn Monroe in a re-creation of Andy Warhol's 1962 painting. The image is a part of the series, “The Malkovich Sessions”, by photographer Sandro Miller and on display at the Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago. Miller wanted to pay homage to the artists who influence his photographic career, and approached Malkovich with the idea of re-creating the famous portraits. (Photo by Sandro Miller/Catherine Edelman Gallery)

John Malkovich as Marilyn Monroe in a re-creation of Andy Warhol's 1962 painting. The image is a part of the series, “The Malkovich Sessions”, by photographer Sandro Miller and on display at the Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago. Miller wanted to pay homage to the artists who influence his photographic career, and approached Malkovich with the idea of re-creating the famous portraits. (Photo by Sandro Miller/Catherine Edelman Gallery)
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06 Oct 2014 08:54:00
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Mongolian Foreign Minister Lundeg Purevsuren watch an archer during a Naadam ceremony, a competition which traditionally includes horse racing, Mongolian wrestling and archery, in Ulan Bator, Mongolia, June 5, 2016. (Photo by Saul Loeb/Reuters)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Mongolian Foreign Minister Lundeg Purevsuren watch an archer during a Naadam ceremony, a competition which traditionally includes horse racing, Mongolian wrestling and archery, in Ulan Bator, Mongolia, June 5, 2016. (Photo by Saul Loeb/Reuters)
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06 Jun 2016 11:10:00
Aerial Nudes by John Crawford

John Crawford was always fascinated of a birds eye view, looking straight down in a vertical perspective. In his series ‘Aerial Nudes’ he is photographing single naked bodies from a high elevation. Perfectly timed photographs show a distant nude body laying down in a series of interesting locations. On each selected shoot day Crawford would deliver his model Carina to the location in the helicopter, positioning her in the carefully arranged set-up, then flying to 600 feet and capturing the image, which would take no more than ten minutes.
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09 Aug 2012 11:35:00