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Million Dollar Car Graveyard (Video)

Michael Fröhlich's Jowett Javelin rotting car in his forest sculpture park in Neandertal Germany, September 11, 2016. An eccentric artist has collected fifty vintage cars and left them to rot in a forest – and now they're worth over $1 million.
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31 Oct 2016 23:22:00

A boy stands near the rotting carcass of a camel that that died of hunger which people had burned to stop the bad smell, in Belif, Garissa county, Kenya Sunday, October 24, 2021. (Photo by Brian Inganga/AP Photo)

A boy stands near the rotting carcass of a camel that that died of hunger which people had burned to stop the bad smell, in Belif, Garissa county, Kenya on Sunday, October 24, 2021. (Photo by Brian Inganga/AP Photo)
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18 Nov 2021 08:25:00
1941 Chevrolet 1.5 tonnes are left to rot in a field. (Photo by Robert Kahl/Mediadrumworld)

Feast your eyes on Europe’s most spectacular car graveyards as discovered by one auto-obsessed explorer who has dedicated over ten years to finding the best cars left to rot in the European wilderness. The beautiful set of images were taken in Germany, Sweden and Belgium by German Civil Servant Robert Kahl (30) using a Nikon D7100. He describes his photographs as showcasing “the beauty of transience and decayed charm”. Here: 1941 Chevrolet 1.5 tonnes are left to rot in a field. (Photo by Robert Kahl/Mediadrumworld)
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01 Mar 2017 00:04:00
The Mexico–United States Wall

The Mexico – United States barrier – also known in the United States as the border fence, rotted fence or border wall – is actually several separation barriers designed to prevent illegal movement across the Mexico – United States border.
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13 May 2013 10:10:00
Michael Fröhlich's Jowett Javelin rotting car in his forest sculpture park in Neandertal Germany, September 11, 2016. An eccentric artist has collected fifty vintage cars and left them to rot in a forest – and now they're worth over $1 million. Former racing driver Michael Fröhlich, from Dusseldorf, Germany, has purposely crashed the cars into trees, buried them in mud and parked them on cliff faces in his estate's garden in the middle of the German Neanderthal. His collections includes a Jaguar XK120 worth $170,000, a Porsche 356 racer and a Buick worth $17,000. Perhaps his most interesting collectable is a Rolls Royce, with a purposefully misspelt “Buckingham Palace” – replacing the B with an F – emblazoned on the side with a replica of the Queen Elizabeth at the wheel. (Photo by Christoph Hagen/Barcroft Images)

Michael Fröhlich's Jowett Javelin rotting car in his forest sculpture park in Neandertal Germany, September 11, 2016. An eccentric artist has collected fifty vintage cars and left them to rot in a forest – and now they're worth over $1 million. Former racing driver Michael Fröhlich, from Dusseldorf, Germany, has purposely crashed the cars into trees, buried them in mud and parked them on cliff faces in his estate's garden in the middle of the German Neanderthal. His collections includes a Jaguar XK120 worth $170,000, a Porsche 356 racer and a Buick worth $17,000. (Photo by Christoph Hagen/Barcroft Images)
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24 Sep 2016 10:56:00
In this February 19, 2014 photo, a skate seller puts slices of skate into styrofoam boxes for shipment to customers around South Korea at a fish market in Mokpo, a port city on the southwestern tip of the Korean Peninsula. The aroma of one of southwestern South Korea's most popular delicacies regularly gets compared to rotting garbage and filthy bathrooms. (Photo by Ahn Young-joon/AP Photo)

In this February 19, 2014 photo, a skate seller puts slices of skate into styrofoam boxes for shipment to customers around South Korea at a fish market in Mokpo, a port city on the southwestern tip of the Korean Peninsula. The aroma of one of southwestern South Korea's most popular delicacies regularly gets compared to rotting garbage and filthy bathrooms. And that's by fans. The unusual dish is typically made by taking dozens of fresh skate, a cartilage-rich fish that looks like a stingray, stacking them up in a walk-in refrigerator and waiting. Up to a month in some cases. (Photo by Ahn Young-joon/AP Photo)
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11 Apr 2014 07:41:00
Is it a leaf? Is it tree bark? No, it’s the Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Cleverly disguised as a rotting leaf, Madagascar’s camouflage king has red eyes, pointy horns and a taste for night hunting: it’s nature’s most devilish deceiver. (Photo by Thomas Marent/ARDEA)

Is it a leaf? Is it tree bark? No, it’s the Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Cleverly disguised as a rotting leaf, Madagascar’s camouflage king has red eyes, pointy horns and a taste for night hunting: it’s nature’s most devilish deceiver. The twisted body and veiny skin echo the detail of a dry leaf, which ensures the gecko blends in with its forest home. The mottled tail appears to have sections missing, as though it has withered over time. This mini-monster epitomises survival of the fittest, having adapted gradually to become today’s extraordinary leaf impersonator. (Photo by Thomas Marent/ARDEA)
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20 Nov 2015 08:03:00
Mummies

Dried and shrivelled corpses, some fully clothed and some in coffins, line the wall of a vault of the Pantheon Cemetery on the summit of Cerro del Trozado in Mexico. They were removed from the crypts because of non-payment of cemetery fees. The hot dry air stopped the bodies from rotting. Most of them were placed here between the turn of the century and WW I. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images). Circa 1955
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29 Aug 2011 13:46:00