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In this November 18, 2014 photo, Murshida, 12, sits on the lap of her mother Marjina as the train leaves for their village in West Bengal, at a railway station in New Delhi, India. Six months ago, Marjina stepped off a train in New Delhi with her two children, hoping to find a better life after her husband abandoned them without so much as a goodbye. (Photo by Altaf Qadri/AP Photo)

In this November 18, 2014 photo, Murshida, 12, sits on the lap of her mother Marjina as the train leaves for their village in West Bengal, at a railway station in New Delhi, India. Six months ago, Marjina stepped off a train in New Delhi with her two children, hoping to find a better life after her husband abandoned them without so much as a goodbye. The family spent their days at a landfill picking through other people’s garbage to find salvageable bits to resell or recycle. After six months of poverty, illness and shame, they returned to that train station in New Delhi, headed back to an uncertain future to their hometown in West Bengal. (Photo by Altaf Qadri/AP Photo)
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09 Dec 2014 09:47:00
“The sustainable development goals cannot be met unless waste management is addressed as a priority”, says UK waste management charity Waste Aid. “E-waste is one of the fastest growing categories of the 7-10bn tonnes of waste produced globally every year”, adds director Mike Webster. “In our view, decent waste management is a basic right and we want governments around the world take this issue much more seriously – in 2012 only 0.2% of international aid went on improving solid waste management – it’s just not enough”. (Photo by Kai Loeffelbein/laif Agentur)

Sustainable development goal target 12.5 is to reduce waste. But with a planet increasingly dependent on technology, is that even possible? As of today, over 30m tonnes of electronic waste has been thrown out so far this year, according to the World Counts. Most e-waste is sent to landfills in Asia and Africa where it is recycled by hand, exposing the people who do it to environmental hazards. Kai Loeffelbein’s photographs of e-waste recycling in Guiyu, southern China show what happens to discarded computers. (Photo by Kai Loeffelbein/laif Agentur)
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19 Oct 2016 12:14:00
An employee sorts waste at the Wecycler recycling  centre in Ebutte Meta district in Lagos, Nigeria July 28, 2016. (Photo by Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters)

An employee sorts waste at the Wecycler recycling centre in Ebutte Meta district in Lagos, Nigeria July 28, 2016. (Photo by Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters)
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29 Jul 2016 12:03:00
A worker distributes electronic waste at a government managed recycling centre at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. (Photo by Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

A worker distributes electronic waste at a government managed recycling centre at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. (Photo by Tyrone Siu/Reuters)
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04 Jul 2015 10:28:00
Demonstrators Protest Castor Nuclear Waste Transport

Tree trunks lie on the railtracks that will be used to transport nuclear waste on November 25, 2011 in Leitstade, near Metzingen, Germany. A train carrying the Castor containers of processed, spent nuclear fuel started from La Hague in France Wednesday for its journey to the Gorleben temporary nuclear waste storage facility in Germany, and thousands of protesters are expected to attempt to blockade the route. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
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26 Nov 2011 12:41:00
An old toilet is displayed during the “Toilet!? Human Waste and Earth's Future” exhibition at The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation – Miraikan on July 1, 2014 in Tokyo, Japan. The exhibition focuses on how the toilet has changed our daily lives and discovers what the most environment-friendly and ideal toilet is. (Photo by Keith Tsuji/Getty Images)

An old toilet is displayed during the “Toilet!? Human Waste and Earth's Future” exhibition at The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation – Miraikan on July 1, 2014 in Tokyo, Japan. The exhibition focuses on how the toilet has changed our daily lives and discovers what the most environment-friendly and ideal toilet is. (Photo by Keith Tsuji/Getty Images)
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03 Jul 2014 11:34:00
Turkish artist Nezaket Ekici performs a live art performance entitled 'Emotion in Motion' on the first day of Art Basel 2015, Hong Kong, China, 13 March 2015. Art Basel 2015 features 233 galleries from 37 countries and territories. (Photo by Alex Hofford/EPA)

Turkish artist Nezaket Ekici performs a live art performance entitled 'Emotion in Motion' on the first day of Art Basel 2015, Hong Kong, China, 13 March 2015. The Hong Kong show of Art Basel features 233 galleries from 37 countries and territories, presenting works ranging from the Modern period of the early 20th century to the most contemporary artists of today, according to the official press release. (Photo by Alex Hofford/EPA)
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18 Mar 2015 11:22:00
The Art Of FeiGiap

There's something inherently Ghibli-esque about Chong FeiGiap's beautiful paintings, capturing that sense of wonder typically present in the best animes the studio had to offer, as well as a dash of Tekkon Kinkreet's amazingly colorful, complex cities.
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03 Oct 2013 11:12:00