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“Bamboo Mist”. (Photo by John Poppleton/Caters News)

A bodypainter uses UV paint to create electrifying masterpieces of stunning landscapes on models. John Poppletons vibrant Bodyscapes feature bright savannahs, lightning storms and vivid galaxies leaping from the bodies of his subjects. The artist, who lives in Wellsville in Utah, USA, uses a black light on his paintings to make them look as close to real life as possible. He predominantly uses female models and often paints across their backs to give him the largest surface area to work with. Here: “Bamboo Mist”. (Photo by John Poppleton/Caters News)
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17 Jul 2015 13:56:00
Dressers make last minute adjustments to the costumes of dancers performing as horses during a press preview of American artist Nick Cave's first major work shown in Australia, entitled HEARD.SYD in Sydney, November 8, 2016. (Photo by Jason Reed/Reuters)

Dressers make last minute adjustments to the costumes of dancers performing as horses during a press preview of American artist Nick Cave's first major work shown in Australia, entitled HEARD.SYD in Sydney, November 8, 2016. Over several days the live art performance will feature 30 “horses” dancing to live percussion beats in suits made from coloured raffia plant fibres. (Photo by Jason Reed/Reuters)
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09 Nov 2016 06:16:00
Young “scissors” dancers pose after performing in a national scissors dance competition at Lima's Exposition Park, May 18, 2014. The Danza de las tijeras, or scissors dance, is a traditional dance from the Peruvian southern region of the Andes, in which two or more performers take turns dancing while accompanied with music from a harp and a violin. Dancers would display various skills and moves, which include cutting the air with the use of a scissors. (Photo by Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters)

Young “scissors” dancers pose after performing in a national scissors dance competition at Lima's Exposition Park, May 18, 2014. The Danza de las tijeras, or scissors dance, is a traditional dance from the Peruvian southern region of the Andes, in which two or more performers take turns dancing while accompanied with music from a harp and a violin. Dancers would display various skills and moves, which include cutting the air with the use of a scissors. (Photo by Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters)
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20 May 2014 10:54:00
1929: Margaret Morris dancers exercising on the sands at Saint-Idesbald

Margaret Morris dancers exercising on the sands at Saint-Idesbald. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images). August 1929
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23 Oct 2011 15:43:00
Bodies In Urban Space

“Bodies in urban spaces” is a temporarily intervention in diversified urban architectural environments. The intention of “Bodies in urban spaces” is to point out the urban functional structure and to uncover the restricted movement possibilities and behavior as well as rules and limitations.
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31 Jul 2014 13:41:00


A man found some raccoons stuck in a dump and couldn't climb out.
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15 Mar 2013 11:27:00
This is the stunning body of work by a talented painter – who transforms humans into amazing animals. From alligators to foxes and even owls, artist Shannon Holt, 39, paints every little detail on models to turn them into wildlife. The incredible paintings, which take anywhere between six to 12.5 hours to complete, are part of her Florida Wildlife Series. (Photo by Ryder Gledhill/Shannon Holt/Caters News)

This is the stunning body of work by a talented painter – who transforms humans into amazing animals. From alligators to foxes and even owls, artist Shannon Holt, 39, paints every little detail on models to turn them into wildlife. The incredible paintings, which take anywhere between six to 12.5 hours to complete, are part of her Florida Wildlife Series. Shannon, from DeLand, Florida, previously worked on different surfaces such as glass, metals and wood. But the animal advocate decided to experiment with human canvasses and incorporate animals in her work. Here: Red Fox. (Photo by Ryder Gledhill/Shannon Holt/Caters News)
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16 Dec 2014 12:13:00
Body Painter By Emma Fay

There is something frightening and at the same time appealing in the living sculptures of 27-year-old British artist Emma Fay. Body art in conjunction with the flexibility of acrobats and fantasy of the artist using water-based paints, a brush and sponge, is transformed into a beautiful work of art. It is not immediately possible to make out the human body in the picture. First you look at the landscape and suddenly begin to distinguish someone’s arm, or neck. Or you look into the eyes of an amazing bull, and it turns out that it is perfectly folded back. Lovely people, temples are and wonderful people-insects are.
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10 Jan 2016 08:02:00