Loading...
Done
This undated photo provided by NOAA in May 2018 shows aurora australis near the South Pole Atmospheric Research Observatory in Antarctica. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole shriveled. But according to a study released on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, scientists say since 2013, there’s more of a banned CFC going into the atmosphere. (Photo by Patrick Cullis/NOAA via AP Photo)

This undated photo provided by NOAA in May 2018 shows aurora australis near the South Pole Atmospheric Research Observatory in Antarctica. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole shriveled. But according to a study released on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, scientists say since 2013, there’s more of a banned CFC going into the atmosphere. (Photo by Patrick Cullis/NOAA via AP Photo)
Details
15 Aug 2018 00:05:00
In this January 27, 2015 photo, penguins walk on the shore of Bahia Almirantazgo in Antarctica.  Antarctica “is big and it's changing and it affects the rest of the planet and we can't afford to ignore what's going on down there”, said David Vaughan, science director of the British Antarctic Survey. (Photo by Natacha Pisarenko/AP Photo)

In this January 27, 2015 photo, penguins walk on the shore of Bahia Almirantazgo in Antarctica. Antarctica “is big and it's changing and it affects the rest of the planet and we can't afford to ignore what's going on down there”, said David Vaughan, science director of the British Antarctic Survey. (Photo by Natacha Pisarenko/AP Photo)
Details
22 Feb 2015 10:45:00
Clash of the storms, New Mexico, US by Camelia Czuchnicki. “A clash between two storm cells in New Mexico, US, each with its own rotating updraft. The curved striations of the oldest noticeable against the new bubbling convection of the newer. It was a fantastic sight to watch and it’s the rarity of such scenes that keep drawing me back to the US Plains each year”. (Photo by Camelia Czuchnicki/Weather Photographer of the Year 2016)

Clash of the storms, New Mexico, US by Camelia Czuchnicki. “A clash between two storm cells in New Mexico, US, each with its own rotating updraft. The curved striations of the oldest noticeable against the new bubbling convection of the newer. It was a fantastic sight to watch and it’s the rarity of such scenes that keep drawing me back to the US Plains each year”. (Photo by Camelia Czuchnicki/Weather Photographer of the Year 2016)
Details
16 Sep 2016 11:11:00
“Hiding In The Shadows”. This Baby Sandhill taking refuge under Moms wings while sitting on her second egg. I witnessed this baby being born earlier that day,and the next morning saw the other one hatch,what a sight to see. Photo location: Deland, Florida. (Photo and caption by Scott Helfrich/National Geographic Photo Contest)

“Hiding In The Shadows”. This Baby Sandhill taking refuge under Moms wings while sitting on her second egg. I witnessed this baby being born earlier that day,and the next morning saw the other one hatch,what a sight to see. Photo location: Deland, Florida. (Photo and caption by Scott Helfrich/National Geographic Photo Contest)
Details
08 Dec 2013 11:51:00
Blaine stands inside the apparatus, surrounded by a million volts of electric currents streamed by tesla coils. The stunt, sponsored by Intel, is the latest of daredevil endeavors by the magician whose previous stunts included being encased in ice for over 60 hours in Times Square, on October 5, 2012. (Photo by John Minchillo/Associated Press)

“Magician David Blaine's latest stunt boasts lots of high-voltage snap, crackle and pop – but experts say he'll be safe from electrocution as long as he wears his chain-mail suit and metal headgear”. – NBC News. Photo: Blaine stands inside the apparatus, surrounded by a million volts of electric currents streamed by tesla coils. The stunt, sponsored by Intel, is the latest of daredevil endeavors by the magician whose previous stunts included being encased in ice for over 60 hours in Times Square, on October 5, 2012. (Photo by John Minchillo/Associated Press)
Details
06 Oct 2012 08:06:00
A visitor takes a picture of goldfish at the Art Aquarium exhibition in Tokyo Friday, August 12, 2016. The exhibition, featuring around 8,000 goldfish in tanks themed on Japan's Edo Period. (Photo by Koji Sasahara/AP Photo)

A visitor takes a picture of goldfish at the Art Aquarium exhibition in Tokyo Friday, August 12, 2016. The exhibition, featuring around 8,000 goldfish in tanks themed on Japan's Edo Period. (Photo by Koji Sasahara/AP Photo)
Details
14 Aug 2016 10:46:00
A PSE&G utility worker watches the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds conduct “a collaborative salute” to honor those battling the COVID-19 pandemic with a flyover of New York and New Jersey, Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in this view from Jersey City, N.J. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP Photo)

A PSE&G utility worker watches the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds conduct “a collaborative salute” to honor those battling the COVID-19 pandemic with a flyover of New York and New Jersey, Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in this view from Jersey City, N.J. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP Photo)
Details
30 Apr 2020 00:07:00
Admirers of Peruvian clown William Rojas, known professionally as “Chupetin”, carry his coffin during his funeral procession to the Eternal Hope cemetery in Huancayo, Peru, on July 2, 2020. Rojas, 45, died from COVID-19 after five days of being in intensive care. Peru surpassed 10,000 deaths from the coronavirus on Thursday, the health ministry said, a day after the government began easing a national lockdown in a bid to revive the economy. (Photo by Pedro Tinoco/AFP Photo)

Admirers of Peruvian clown William Rojas, known professionally as “Chupetin”, carry his coffin during his funeral procession to the Eternal Hope cemetery in Huancayo, Peru, on July 2, 2020. Rojas, 45, died from COVID-19 after five days of being in intensive care. Peru surpassed 10,000 deaths from the coronavirus on Thursday, the health ministry said, a day after the government began easing a national lockdown in a bid to revive the economy. (Photo by Pedro Tinoco/AFP Photo)
Details
05 Jul 2020 00:07:00