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Tin and Naing win live on a small boat which they sail throughout the Delta region in Myanmar. The former gardeners once had a home on land but it was destroyed when a powerful cyclone ravaged the area in 2008. Since then, the couple have not been able to afford to rebuild their home, so they live on the boat from which they sell fish paste to make a living. (Photo by Muse Mohammed/IOM)

The ferocity of crises worldwide is forcing a record number of people to flee their homes, seeking some form of safety within their own country or across international borders. There are 65.3 million displaced people worldwide, including 21.3 million refugees. Most have lost their homes to armed conflict or natural disasters but other factors, such as extreme poverty and climate change, also drive displacement. The International Organisation for Migration commissioned photojournalist Muse Mohammed to document the plight of the displaced. (Photo by Muse Mohammed/IOM)
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02 Jan 2017 12:04:00
Immigrants from the West Indies at Victoria Station in London, 1956. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

Immigrants from the West Indies at Victoria Station in London, 1956. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
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08 Dec 2016 12:30:00
A woman from a group called “Las Patronas” (The bosses), a charitable organization that feeds Central American immigrants who travel atop a freight train known as “La Bestia”, passes food and water to immigrants on their way to the border with the United States, at Amatlan de los Reyes, in Veracruz state, Mexico October 22, 2016. (Photo by Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

A woman from a group called “Las Patronas” (The bosses), a charitable organization that feeds Central American immigrants who travel atop a freight train known as “La Bestia”, passes food and water to immigrants on their way to the border with the United States, at Amatlan de los Reyes, in Veracruz state, Mexico October 22, 2016. (Photo by Daniel Becerril/Reuters)
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18 Nov 2016 10:55:00
A Ruthenian woman circa 1906 from the region historically inhabiting the kingdom of the Rus, incorporating parts of modern-day Slavic speaking countries. Her outfit consists of a shirt and underskirt made from linen embroidered with traditional floral-based patterns. (Photo by Augustus Francis Sherman/New York Public Library/The Guardian)

Many of the 12 million people who entered the US through New York’s Ellis Island wore traditional dress from their homelands. Here: A Ruthenian woman circa 1906 from the region historically inhabiting the kingdom of the Rus, incorporating parts of modern-day Slavic speaking countries. Her outfit consists of a shirt and underskirt made from linen embroidered with traditional floral-based patterns. (Photo by Augustus Francis Sherman/New York Public Library/The Guardian)
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03 Oct 2016 09:15:00
An overcrowded dinghy with migrants from different African countries is followed by members of the German NGO Jugend Rettet as they approach the Iuventa vessel during a rescue operation, off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea  September 21, 2016. (Photo by Zohra Bensemra/Reuters)

An overcrowded dinghy with migrants from different African countries is followed by members of the German NGO Jugend Rettet as they approach the Iuventa vessel during a rescue operation, off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea September 21, 2016. (Photo by Zohra Bensemra/Reuters)
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23 Sep 2016 09:34:00
African migrants stranded in Costa Rica walk near garbage on the Inter-American highway at the border between Costa Rica and Nicaragua, in Penas Blancas, Costa Rica, September 8, 2016. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)

African migrants stranded in Costa Rica walk near garbage on the Inter-American highway at the border between Costa Rica and Nicaragua, in Penas Blancas, Costa Rica, September 8, 2016. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)
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09 Sep 2016 08:50:00
A year after hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees snaked their way across southeastern Europe and onto television screens worldwide, the roads through the Balkans are now clear, depriving an arguably worsening tragedy of its poignant visibility. Europe's migrant crisis is at the very least numerically worse than it was last year. More people are arriving and more are dying. (Photo by Antonio Bronic/Reuters)

A year after hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees snaked their way across southeastern Europe and onto television screens worldwide, the roads through the Balkans are now clear, depriving an arguably worsening tragedy of its poignant visibility. Reuters photographer, Antonio Bronic revisiting the people-packed locations where he and his colleagues captured last year's diaspora, found empty roads, unencumbered railway tracks and bucolic countryside. (Photo by Antonio Bronic/Reuters)



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12 Aug 2016 12:10:00
Migrants play soccer at makeshift camp in Via Cupa (Gloomy Street) in downtown Rome, Italy, August 2, 2016. Italy is taking in thousands of boat migrants every week for a third year in a row, and friction is common between them and those who live along the path many take on their journey towards northern Europe. Set up by volunteers, the Baobab centre, by Rome's Tiburtina train station, was shut down by police in December in the wake of the Paris attacks and because the European Union wants Italy to stop migrants from moving on, not help them to do so. B(Photo by Max Rossi/Reuters)

Migrants play soccer at makeshift camp in Via Cupa (Gloomy Street) in downtown Rome, Italy, August 2, 2016. Italy is taking in thousands of boat migrants every week for a third year in a row, and friction is common between them and those who live along the path many take on their journey towards northern Europe. (Photo by Max Rossi/Reuters)
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11 Aug 2016 14:31:00