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A peacock walks next to the Monastery of the Holy Apostles, on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, northern Israel November 30, 2016. (Photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

A peacock walks next to the Monastery of the Holy Apostles, on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, northern Israel November 30, 2016. About 1 million tourists from abroad visit the Sea of Galilee, also known as Lake Tiberias or Kinneret, each year, according to the Israeli Tourism Ministry. (Photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)
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21 Dec 2016 09:57:00
Trucks loaded with tree trunks are burned by agents of the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, or Ibama, during an operation to combat illegal mining and logging, in the municipality of Novo Progresso, Para State, northern Brazil, November 11, 2016. When able to do their job, agents of the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, or Ibama, are decisive, punishing illegal loggers on the spot. Nearly twice the size of India, the Amazon absorbs an estimated 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, making its preservation vital in the fight to halt global warming. Ibama, responsible for preserving Brazil's 65 percent share of the world's largest rainforest, is one of the most important groups in that fight. But after years of surprising success, the rate of deforestation is on the rise again. Over the past four years it has risen 35 percent, as Ibama suffered from a lack of funding amid Brazil's worst recession in a century. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

Trucks loaded with tree trunks are burned by agents of the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, or Ibama, during an operation to combat illegal mining and logging, in the municipality of Novo Progresso, Para State, northern Brazil, November 11, 2016. When able to do their job, agents of the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, or Ibama, are decisive, punishing illegal loggers on the spot. Nearly twice the size of India, the Amazon absorbs an estimated 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, making its preservation vital in the fight to halt global warming. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)
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30 Nov 2016 12:36:00
Up to 35% of Mongolians still live a nomadic life, depending on their land to survive. But environmental changes, particularly desertification, means this way of life is under threat. Korean photographer Daesung Lee’s Futuristic Archaeology images show billboard-size backdrops of lush steppe contrasting with actual scenery as former nomads enact scenes of hunting, herding and Mongolian wrestling. (Photo by Daesung Lee)

Up to 35% of Mongolians still live a nomadic life, depending on their land to survive. But environmental changes, particularly desertification, means this way of life is under threat. Korean photographer Daesung Lee’s Futuristic Archaeology images show billboard-size backdrops of lush steppe contrasting with actual scenery as former nomads enact scenes of hunting, herding and Mongolian wrestling. (Photo by Daesung Lee)
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24 Nov 2016 08:01:00
A Baby sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) plays around in a tree as they train at Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme's rehabilitation center on November 12, 2016 in Kuta Mbelin, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The Orangutans in Indonesia have been known to be on the verge of extinction as a result of deforestation and poaching. Found mostly in South-East Asia, where they live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo, the endangered species continue to lose their habitat as a result of corporate expansion in a developing economy. Indonesia approved palm oil concessions on nearly 15 million acres of peatlands over the past years and thousands of square miles have been cleared for plantations, including the lowland areas that are the prime habitat for orangutans. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

A Baby sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) plays around in a tree as they train at Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme's rehabilitation center on November 12, 2016 in Kuta Mbelin, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The Orangutans in Indonesia have been known to be on the verge of extinction as a result of deforestation and poaching. Found mostly in South-East Asia, where they live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo, the endangered species continue to lose their habitat as a result of corporate expansion in a developing economy. Indonesia approved palm oil concessions on nearly 15 million acres of peatlands over the past years and thousands of square miles have been cleared for plantations, including the lowland areas that are the prime habitat for orangutans. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
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16 Nov 2016 11:14:00
An environmental activist adjusts his mask while taking part in “The Dead Sea Swim Challenge”, swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)

An environmental activist adjusts his mask while taking part in “The Dead Sea Swim Challenge”, swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. Swimmers from around the world plunged into the salty waters of the Dead Sea on Tuesday to attempt a seven-hour swim across the fabled lake in a bid to draw attention to its environmental degradation. Wearing protective masks and snorkels, 25 swimmers paddled through the muddy water to attempt the 9-mile (15-kilometer) swim from Jordan to Israel. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)
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16 Nov 2016 10:59:00
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry stands inside the historic Shackleton hut near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, Friday, November 11, 2016. Kerry became the highest-ranking American official to visit Antarctica when he landed for a two-day trip on Friday. He's been hearing from scientists about the impact of climate change on the frozen continent. Kerry's aides described the trip as a learning opportunity for the secretary of state. He has been receiving briefings from scientists working to understand the effects of climate change on Antarctica. Kerry has made climate change an intensive focus of American diplomacy during his term, and had previously spent decades working on the issue as a U.S. senator. Trump has called climate change a hoax and said he would “cancel” U.S. involvement in the landmark Paris Agreement on global warming. (Photo by Mark Ralston/Pool Photo via AP Photo)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry stands inside the historic Shackleton hut near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, Friday, November 11, 2016. Kerry became the highest-ranking American official to visit Antarctica when he landed for a two-day trip on Friday. He's been hearing from scientists about the impact of climate change on the frozen continent. Kerry's aides described the trip as a learning opportunity for the secretary of state. He has been receiving briefings from scientists working to understand the effects of climate change on Antarctica. Kerry has made climate change an intensive focus of American diplomacy during his term, and had previously spent decades working on the issue as a U.S. senator. Trump has called climate change a hoax and said he would “cancel” U.S. involvement in the landmark Paris Agreement on global warming. (Photo by Mark Ralston/Pool Photo via AP Photo)
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12 Nov 2016 10:09:00
The carcass of a yacare caiman lies in the dried-up river bed of the Pilcomayo river in Boqueron, Paraguay, August 14, 2016. In Paraguay, alongside the Pilcomayo River, black vultures flew over a shrinking pond where a group of crocodilian reptiles known as yacare caimans sought refuge. Water from the river, which divides Paraguay and Argentina in the area of the Gran Chaco, was scarce. This is not an uncommon sight in the region of General Diaz, about 700 kilometres (435 miles) northwest of the country's capital Asuncion, where the Pilcomayo's waters form lakes and streams that give life to capybaras, birds and caimans. “The river's situation is critical. No water is forecast to enter the basin until December, as happens every year”, said Alcides Gonzalez, a resident of the area. (Photo by Jorge Adorno/Reuters)

The carcass of a yacare caiman lies in the dried-up river bed of the Pilcomayo river in Boqueron, Paraguay, August 14, 2016. In Paraguay, alongside the Pilcomayo River, black vultures flew over a shrinking pond where a group of crocodilian reptiles known as yacare caimans sought refuge. Water from the river, which divides Paraguay and Argentina in the area of the Gran Chaco, was scarce. This is not an uncommon sight in the region of General Diaz, about 700 kilometres (435 miles) northwest of the country's capital Asuncion, where the Pilcomayo's waters form lakes and streams that give life to capybaras, birds and caimans. (Photo by Jorge Adorno/Reuters)
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03 Nov 2016 12:40:00
“The sustainable development goals cannot be met unless waste management is addressed as a priority”, says UK waste management charity Waste Aid. “E-waste is one of the fastest growing categories of the 7-10bn tonnes of waste produced globally every year”, adds director Mike Webster. “In our view, decent waste management is a basic right and we want governments around the world take this issue much more seriously – in 2012 only 0.2% of international aid went on improving solid waste management – it’s just not enough”. (Photo by Kai Loeffelbein/laif Agentur)

Sustainable development goal target 12.5 is to reduce waste. But with a planet increasingly dependent on technology, is that even possible? As of today, over 30m tonnes of electronic waste has been thrown out so far this year, according to the World Counts. Most e-waste is sent to landfills in Asia and Africa where it is recycled by hand, exposing the people who do it to environmental hazards. Kai Loeffelbein’s photographs of e-waste recycling in Guiyu, southern China show what happens to discarded computers. (Photo by Kai Loeffelbein/laif Agentur)
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19 Oct 2016 12:14:00