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Sarah Gibbons grades a new batch of Maple Syrup at Gibbons Family Farm in Frankville, Ontario, Canada, 31 March 2014. The annual maple syrup season marks the end of the often brutal central Canadian winters and heralds the beginning of spring. The maple tree, whose leaf dominates the Canada's flag, plays both a symbolic and practical role in the identity of Canadians who produce around 95 percent of the world's supply of maple syrup. (Photo by Stephen Morrison/EPA)

Sarah Gibbons grades a new batch of Maple Syrup at Gibbons Family Farm in Frankville, Ontario, Canada, 31 March 2014. The annual maple syrup season marks the end of the often brutal central Canadian winters and heralds the beginning of spring. The maple tree, whose leaf dominates the Canada's flag, plays both a symbolic and practical role in the identity of Canadians who produce around 95 percent of the world's supply of maple syrup. (Photo by Stephen Morrison/EPA)
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08 May 2014 07:24:00
Tommy Lindsey holds an enormous maple leaf that he found in Mount Vernon, Wash., October 28, 2013. Lindsey was walking with his family when he picked up the leaf that is more than two feet from stem to tip and more than 21 inches wide. (Photo by Frank Varga/The Skagit Valley Herald)

Tommy Lindsey holds an enormous maple leaf that he found in Mount Vernon, Wash., October 28, 2013. Lindsey was walking with his family when he picked up the leaf that is more than two feet from stem to tip and more than 21 inches wide. (Photo by Frank Varga/The Skagit Valley Herald)
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07 Nov 2013 10:59:00
Samurai Flyer

David Sharp, an engineer with Lockheed Martin, displays the “Samurai Flyer”, an aviation design inspired by the maple seed, during the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Conference August 16, 2011 in Washington, DC. Lockheed Martin unveiled the new design and demonstrated vertical takeoff and landing, stable hover, and on-board video streaming of the aircraft during their demonstration. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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17 Aug 2011 11:56:00
Jewelry By Marcel Dunger

The ingenuity of people is endless. Could you imagine that broken pieces of maple wood could be used to create beautiful jewelry? Well Marcel Dunger has done just that! By using colored bio-resin and broken bits of wood, he was able to create marvelous pieces of jewelry. The result has a very futuristic feel to it. The angular form and strict design make this jewelry seem as if it was taken from a sci-fi movie. People often consider the most bizarre things to be art. However, in this case, the resulting creations were actually very aesthetically appealing. (Photo by Marcel Dunger)
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19 Oct 2014 12:13:00
4 Colour Sun Wheel

4 Colour Sun Wheel

Richard Shilling is a British Land Artist who makes surprising sculptures in the landscape. Using only natural materials, this artist spreads beauty, has a political message and connects people to one another.
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07 Jun 2012 09:32:00
A boy covers his head with fallen leaves as he enjoys a stroll with his family in a park in downtown Frankfurt, Germany, November 6, 2016. (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)

A boy covers his head with fallen leaves as he enjoys a stroll with his family in a park in downtown Frankfurt, Germany, November 6, 2016. (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)
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14 Sep 2017 07:56:00
The Wood Art Of Mark Doolittle

Mantle Or Desk Clock “Ancient Sea Form”

A large Mantle or Desk Clock featuring a fossil ammonite at its center, carved from the South American wood Keolbra with radiating Walnut spines. The clock hangs on a round, Plexiglass back supported by a wood base (Bubinga). The clockworks is a quartz, high-torque movement that runs on a single AA battery.
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21 Nov 2013 11:49:00
“Don't Leave Any Food On Your Plate”. The giraffes at Nairobi's Giraffe Manor are totally at home with humans. They will eat out of your hand, or even off your plate. Photo location: Giraffe Manor, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo and caption by Gavin Werbeloff/National Geographic Photo Contest)

“Don't Leave Any Food On Your Plate”. The giraffes at Nairobi's Giraffe Manor are totally at home with humans. They will eat out of your hand, or even off your plate. Photo location: Giraffe Manor, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo and caption by Gavin Werbeloff/National Geographic Photo Contest)
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20 Jun 2014 10:23:00