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Cattle are the most important way of livelihood for the Karamojong: they provide milk, meat, blood and money when sold, Karamoja, Uganda, February 2017. (Photo by Sumy Sadurni/Barcroft Images)

Cattle are the most important way of livelihood for the Karamojong: they provide milk, meat, blood and money when sold, Karamoja, Uganda, February 2017. (Photo by Sumy Sadurni/Barcroft Images)
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17 Feb 2017 00:02:00
A Kenyan model Ajuma Nasanyana waits behind the scenes before the fashion show showcasing African fashion and culture during a gala marking the launch of a book called “African Twilight: The Vanishing Rituals and Ceremonies of the African Continent” at the African Heritage House in Nairobi, Kenya on March 3, 2019. (Photo by Baz Ratner/Reuters)

A Kenyan model Ajuma Nasanyana waits behind the scenes before the fashion show showcasing African fashion and culture during a gala marking the launch of a book called “African Twilight: The Vanishing Rituals and Ceremonies of the African Continent” at the African Heritage House in Nairobi, Kenya on March 3, 2019. (Photo by Baz Ratner/Reuters)
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06 Mar 2019 00:01:00
Hamar women dance before a bull jumping ceremony in Ethiopia's southern Omo Valley region near Turmi on September 19, 2016. The Hamar are a Nilotic ethnic group in Ethiopia. The construction of the Gibe III dam, the third largest hydroelectric plant in Africa, and large areas of very “thirsty” cotton and sugar plantations and factories along the Omo river are impacting heavily on the lives of tribes living in the Omo Valley who depend on the river for their survival and way of life. Human rights groups fear for the future of the tribes if they are forced to scatter, give up traditional ways through loss of land or ability to keep cattle as globalisation and development increases. (Photo by Carl De Souza/AFP Photo)

Hamar women dance before a bull jumping ceremony in Ethiopia's southern Omo Valley region near Turmi on September 19, 2016. The Hamar are a Nilotic ethnic group in Ethiopia. The construction of the Gibe III dam, the third largest hydroelectric plant in Africa, and large areas of very “thirsty” cotton and sugar plantations and factories along the Omo river are impacting heavily on the lives of tribes living in the Omo Valley who depend on the river for their survival and way of life. (Photo by Carl De Souza/AFP Photo)
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02 Oct 2016 08:45:00
An indigenous girl carries a monkey inside her house in their village at Xingu national park in Mato Grosso, Brazil, October 2, 2015. (Photo by Paulo Whitaker/Reuters)

An indigenous girl carries a monkey inside her house in their village at Xingu national park in Mato Grosso, Brazil, October 2, 2015. The Kamayura tribe consists of around 300 people, and is one of the 16 ethnic groups living in the indigenous Xingu national park. (Photo by Paulo Whitaker/Reuters)
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18 Oct 2015 08:03:00
Using his camera skills, Marc meters the background sky in order to achieve the beautiful black silhouettes of the wildlife, Africa, 2010-2016. A photographer has travelled around Africa for six years to capture striking silhouettes of lions, giraffes and birds. Australian wildlife photographer, Marc Mol took the series of pictures in various areas of Africa; including Botswana and Kenya to Tanzania and Zambia. Whether grazing, hunting or resting, the animals' daily activities are transformed into something majestic when cast against golden evenings and pink dawns. (Photo by Marc Mol/Barcroft Images)

Using his camera skills, Marc meters the background sky in order to achieve the beautiful black silhouettes of the wildlife, Africa, 2010-2016. (Photo by Marc Mol/Barcroft Images)
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10 Jan 2017 13:36:00
A man lies on the floor during a ritual at the Sorte Mountain on the outskirts of Chivacoa, in the state of Yaracuy, Venezuela October 10, 2015. (Photo by Marco Bello/Reuters)

A man lies on the floor during a ritual at the Sorte Mountain on the outskirts of Chivacoa, in the state of Yaracuy, Venezuela October 10, 2015. One long night every year in a mountainous rainforest in Venezuela, hundreds gather to dance on red-hot embers, enter trance-like states, and worship an ancient goddess known as Maria Lionza. Those who travel to the mountain known as Sorte in central Venezuela are practitioners of a cult that is built on local indigenous traditions. (Photo by Marco Bello/Reuters)
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08 Jul 2016 12:19:00
Bej indian in the Xingu river, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil on December 20, 2015 .(Photo by Ricardo Stuckert/Caters News Agency)

These images offer a rare glimpse of life within remote Brazilian tribes. Award winning photographer Ricardo, 47, said: “The pictures show the traditional way of life of these people who live in harmony with nature. The photos provide an overview of the contemporary situation of the indigenous people in Brazil”. Here: Bej indian in the Xingu river, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil on December 20, 2015 .(Photo by Ricardo Stuckert/Caters News Agency)
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12 Dec 2017 06:46:00
An empty camp is shown beneath a colourful sky in Siberia, December 2016. (Photo by Timothy Allen/Barcroft Productions)

A British photographer has captured life at the “edge of the world”. Timothy Allen, best known for his work on BBC's Human Planet, trekked through the freezing Siberian wilderness for 16 days as he joined part of an 800km migration of reindeer in the Yamal-Nenets region – a name that roughly translates to “edge of the world”. The stunning pictures feature the nomadic Nenets tribe, who drink blood to survive in -45°C temperatures. Timothy's epic journey, which will be revealed in an eight-minute documentary on Animal Planet USA, saw him travel across the bleak terrain of the frozen Ob River with the Nenets people in December last year. Here: An empty camp is shown beneath a colourful sky in Siberia, December 2016. (Photo by Timothy Allen/Barcroft Productions)
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19 Sep 2017 07:48:00