Loading...
Done
Stunning images capture the tribes of Papua New Guinea during a gathering of clans. (Photo by Trevor Cole/Media Drum World)

These powerful images capture the spear-wielding tribes of Papua new Guinea who believe they are possessed with the spirit of the crocodile. They show how the Kangunaman clansmen scar their backs to resemble reptile scales while the Huli Wigmen wear elaborate headdresses to signal they are ready for battle. (Photo by Trevor Cole/Media Drum World)
Details
05 May 2018 00:05:00
Sudanese cattle keepers from Dinka tribe Makal Maker (R) and Achiek Butich pose with the guns for their protection at their cattle camp in Mingkaman, Lakes State, South Sudan, on March 2, 2018. (Photo by  Stefanie Glinski/AFP Photo)

Sudanese cattle keepers from Dinka tribe Makal Maker (R) and Achiek Butich pose with the guns for their protection at their cattle camp in Mingkaman, Lakes State, South Sudan, on March 2, 2018. (Photo by Stefanie Glinski/AFP Photo)
Details
16 Mar 2018 00:05:00
Bej indian in the Xingu river, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil on December 20, 2015 .(Photo by Ricardo Stuckert/Caters News Agency)

These images offer a rare glimpse of life within remote Brazilian tribes. Award winning photographer Ricardo, 47, said: “The pictures show the traditional way of life of these people who live in harmony with nature. The photos provide an overview of the contemporary situation of the indigenous people in Brazil”. Here: Bej indian in the Xingu river, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil on December 20, 2015 .(Photo by Ricardo Stuckert/Caters News Agency)
Details
12 Dec 2017 06:46:00
Chieftain Japarupi Waiapi shows a roasted monkey -part of Waiapi's diet, also based in Manioc and fruits- at the reserve in Amapa state in Brazil on October 13, 2017. When Waiapis walks into the Amazon forest surrounding their village, they do not see trees, but a kind of shopping mall providing medicine, food, shelter, tools and weapons  all under the eye of multiple spirits. (Photo by Apu Gomes/AFP Photo)

Chieftain Japarupi Waiapi shows a roasted monkey -part of Waiapi's diet, also based in Manioc and fruits- at the reserve in Amapa state in Brazil on October 13, 2017. When Waiapis walks into the Amazon forest surrounding their village, they do not see trees, but a kind of shopping mall providing medicine, food, shelter, tools and weapons all under the eye of multiple spirits. (Photo by Apu Gomes/AFP Photo)
Details
27 Oct 2017 08:39:00
An empty camp is shown beneath a colourful sky in Siberia, December 2016. (Photo by Timothy Allen/Barcroft Productions)

A British photographer has captured life at the “edge of the world”. Timothy Allen, best known for his work on BBC's Human Planet, trekked through the freezing Siberian wilderness for 16 days as he joined part of an 800km migration of reindeer in the Yamal-Nenets region – a name that roughly translates to “edge of the world”. The stunning pictures feature the nomadic Nenets tribe, who drink blood to survive in -45°C temperatures. Timothy's epic journey, which will be revealed in an eight-minute documentary on Animal Planet USA, saw him travel across the bleak terrain of the frozen Ob River with the Nenets people in December last year. Here: An empty camp is shown beneath a colourful sky in Siberia, December 2016. (Photo by Timothy Allen/Barcroft Productions)
Details
19 Sep 2017 07:48:00
Once applied, the designs are washed using warm water and cow dung. Herbs are applied to promote faster healing. (Photo by Ronny Sen/WaterAid/The Guardian)

For more than 2,000 years, women from the Baiga tribe in the highland district of Dindori, in central India’s Madhya Pradesh state, have been tattooed. Sumintra, 25, from Bona village, has the markings across her forehead, legs and arms. The women who work as tattoo artists are knowledgable about the different types of designs and pigments preferred by various tribes, and their meanings are passed to them by their mothers. The tattooing ‘season’ begins with the approach of winter. (Photo by Ronny Sen/WaterAid/The Guardian)
Details
19 Aug 2017 08:48:00
The mudmen come from the country’s western highlands, where there are virtually no roads, cars, electricity or shops. (Photo by Jeremy Hunter/Exclusivepix Media)

For centuries the Highlands peoples of Papua New Guinea fought over land, women and pigs. Sorcery and battle skills could elevate a clan to Bigmanship, where the bigger the “presentation”, the bigger the man. Clans therefore would paint their bodies and create fearsome masks as part of their psy. Here: These are the terrifying tribe of “mudmen” from a remote part of Papua New Guinea. (Photo by Jeremy Hunter/Exclusivepix Media)
Details
08 May 2017 08:12:00
A tribeswoman sporting a huge lip plate and wearing a skinned animal carcass on her head. (Photo by Eric Lafforgue/Exclusivepix Media)

Warriors from the Suri tribe in Ethiopia still stage the savage “Donga” battles – even after many fighters have been died from their injuries. Donga stick fights take place after the harvests, the Surmas count days owing to knots on a long stem of grass or jags on the trunk of a tree dedicated to that specific use. Here: A tribeswoman sporting a huge lip plate and wearing a skinned animal carcass on her head. (Photo by Eric Lafforgue/Exclusivepix Media)
Details
22 Apr 2017 09:30:00