Loading...
Done
Ngorongoro Crater (Tanzania). At 610m deep and 260 sq km, this is the largest unflooded caldera in the world. A blue-green vision from above it's a haven for engangered wildlife and Maasai livestock. The crater was formed three million years ago when a giant volcano, which could have been as high as Kilimanjaro, exploded and collapsed. The caldera formed the concentric fractures in the crust cracked down to a magma reservoir deep underground. (Photo by John Bryant/Getty Images)

Ngorongoro Crater (Tanzania). At 610m deep and 260 sq km, this is the largest unflooded caldera in the world. A blue-green vision from above it's a haven for engangered wildlife and Maasai livestock. The crater was formed three million years ago when a giant volcano, which could have been as high as Kilimanjaro, exploded and collapsed. The caldera formed the concentric fractures in the crust cracked down to a magma reservoir deep underground. (Photo by John Bryant/Getty Images)
Details
28 Mar 2014 08:08:00
Blue Lava, Kawah Ijen Volcano, Indonesia

Located in East Java, Indonesia, Kawah Ijen is a volcano is home to the largest acidic crater lake in the world. What turns the waters of the lake in the 1 km caldera its beautiful turquoise color are the highly sulfuric gases emitted from the volcano underneath.
Details
07 May 2014 12:20:00
Thanks to plenty of salt minerals and heavy elements in the soil, the Dallol volcano in Ethiopia produces brilliantly colored pools of water at the top of its caldera. And, as if to add greater effect to the already stunning sights, the volcano stands apart from the salt plains around it like an island. This hotspot was created through phreatomagmatic eruptions caused by magma interacting with water, and was further altered due to the presence of salt water. (Photo by Francisco Pandolfo/Caters News)

Thanks to plenty of salt minerals and heavy elements in the soil, the Dallol volcano in Ethiopia produces brilliantly colored pools of water at the top of its caldera. And, as if to add greater effect to the already stunning sights, the volcano stands apart from the salt plains around it like an island. This hotspot was created through phreatomagmatic eruptions caused by magma interacting with water, and was further altered due to the presence of salt water. (Photo by Francisco Pandolfo/Caters News)
Details
10 Feb 2016 11:36:00
A Tenggerese shaman praying for worshippers at Widodaren cave during the Tenggerese Hindu Yadnya Kasada festival on July 31, 2015 in Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. The festival is the main festival of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. On the fourteenth day, the Tenggerese make the journey to Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

A Tenggerese shaman praying for worshippers at Widodaren cave during the Tenggerese Hindu Yadnya Kasada festival on July 31, 2015 in Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. The festival is the main festival of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. On the fourteenth day, the Tenggerese make the journey to Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. The origin of the festival lies in the 15th century when a princess named Roro Anteng started the principality of Tengger with her husband Joko Seger, and the childless couple asked the mountain Gods for help in bearing children. The legend says the Gods granted them 24 children but on the provision that the 25th must be tossed into the volcano in sacrifice. The 25th child, Kesuma, was finally sacrificed in this way after initial refusal, and the tradition of throwing sacrifices into the caldera to appease the mountain Gods continues today. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
Details
01 Aug 2015 12:07:00
Sulfur mining in Kawah Ijen Lake

The Ijen volcano complex is a group of stratovolcanoes, in East Java, Indonesia. It is inside a larger caldera Ijen, which is about 20 kilometers wide. The Gunung Merapi stratovolcano is the highest point of that complex. The name of this volcano resembles that of a different volcano, Mount Merapi in central Java, also known as Gunung Merapi; there is also a third volcano named Marapi in Sumatra. The name "Merapi" means "fire" in the Indonesian language.
Details
03 Aug 2012 08:37:00
Dhofar Region, Oman. Much of Oman is desert, but the Arabian Sea coast in the Dhofar region represents a startling difference in climate. This coastal region catches the monsoon rains, or khareef, during the summer months. Drenching rains fall primarily on the mountainous ridge that separates the lush, fertile areas along the coast from the arid interior, recharging streams, waterfalls and springs that provide plentiful water supplies in the fertile lowlands for the remainder of the year. Image taken by Landsat 5 on April 2, 2005. (Photo by USGS/NASA)

Dhofar Region, Oman. Much of Oman is desert, but the Arabian Sea coast in the Dhofar region represents a startling difference in climate. This coastal region catches the monsoon rains, or khareef, during the summer months. Drenching rains fall primarily on the mountainous ridge that separates the lush, fertile areas along the coast from the arid interior, recharging streams, waterfalls and springs that provide plentiful water supplies in the fertile lowlands for the remainder of the year. Image taken by Landsat 5 on April 2, 2005. (Photo by USGS/NASA)
Details
25 Dec 2012 11:13:00
Smoke plumes rise from Mount Etna, one of the most active volcanoes in the world in Sicily, Italy on June 28, 2016. (Photo by Etna Walk/Rex Feature/Shutterstock)

Smoke plumes rise from Mount Etna, one of the most active volcanoes in the world in Sicily, Italy on June 28, 2016. (Photo by Etna Walk/Rex Feature/Shutterstock)
Details
12 Sep 2016 10:24:00
In this Friday, August. 17, 2018, photo, a North Korean waitress prepares to serve dinner to Chinese tourists at the Pegaebong hotel in Samjiyong in North Korea. Chinese businesspeople and tourists are once again flowing over the borders – several large tourist groups were in Samjiyon last week – and South Korean officials are seriously considering ways to help the North improve its roads and railways. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

In this Friday, August. 17, 2018, photo, a North Korean waitress prepares to serve dinner to Chinese tourists at the Pegaebong hotel in Samjiyong in North Korea. Chinese businesspeople and tourists are once again flowing over the borders – several large tourist groups were in Samjiyon last week – and South Korean officials are seriously considering ways to help the North improve its roads and railways. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)
Details
07 Sep 2018 00:01:00