Loading...
Done
A referee tries to separate two cocks fighting during a Cock fighting tournament on December 3, 2016 on the outskirts of Antananarivo. (Photo by Gianluigi Guercia/AFP Photo)

A referee tries to separate two cocks fighting during a Cock fighting tournament on December 3, 2016 on the outskirts of Antananarivo, Madagascar. Cockfighting is held during the week end and is a tradition with asian roots still practiced in Madagascar. (Photo by Gianluigi Guercia/AFP Photo)
Details
10 Dec 2016 08:28:00
A helicopter of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) flies through millions of Locusts as spreads pesticide to fight against a swarm of locusts threatening to reach Amparihibe village on May 7, 2014 in Tsiroanomandidy , Madagascar. FAO mission is to fight the locust's swarm with an insecticide. (Photo by AFP Photo/RIJASOLO)

A helicopter of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) flies through millions of Locusts as spreads pesticide to fight against a swarm of locusts threatening to reach Amparihibe village on May 7, 2014 in Tsiroanomandidy, Madagascar. FAO mission is to fight the locust's swarm with an insecticide. (Photo by AFP Photo/RIJASOLO)
Details
16 May 2014 08:32:00
The Bratz Rock Angels are displayed at the Dream Toys 2005 Pre-Christmas Expo

The Bratz Rock Angels are displayed at the Dream Toys 2005 Pre-Christmas Expo on October 5, 2005 in London. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Details
14 Dec 2011 13:27:00


The annual Victory Day military parade takes place at Red Square on May 09, 2008 in Moscow, Russia. Russia's most important national holiday honours over 26 million Soviet soldiers killed during World War II. Around 8,000 soldiers in newly designed uniforms paraded in the largest Victory Day display of heavy weaponry since the collapse of the Soviet Union. (Photo by Dima Korotayev/Epsilon/Getty Images)
Details
09 May 2011 07:20:00
The Sifaka jumps along the road. (Photo by Shannon Wild/Caters News Agency)

The Verreauxs Sifaka, otherwise known as Dancing Sifaka, who was caught strutting its stuff in Madagascar, has definitely learnt a lesson or two from King Julian – from the 2005 film “Madagascar”. Raising both of its arms and lunging from side to side, this lemur definitely likes to move it, move it. (Photo by Shannon Wild/Caters News Agency)
Details
24 Jan 2018 06:17:00


“The aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a lemur, a strepsirrhine primate native to Madagascar that combines rodent-like teeth and a special thin middle finger to fill the same ecological niche as a woodpecker. It is the world's largest nocturnal primate, and is characterized by its unusual method of finding food; it taps on trees to find grubs, then gnaws holes in the wood and inserts its narrow middle finger to pull the grubs out. The only other animal species known to find food in this way is the striped possum. From an ecological point of view the aye-aye fills the niche of a woodpecker as it is capable of penetrating wood to extract the invertebrates within”. – Wikipedia

Photo: In this handout image from Bristol Zoo is seen the first captive bred aye-aye in the UK named “Kintana” (meaning star in Malagasy) April 15, 2005 at Bristol Zoo Gardens, England. The zoo announced today only the second baby aye-aye to be hand-reared in the world (the first was in Jersey Zoo) and has now made his first public appearance since his birth on 11 February 2005. (Photo by Rob Cousins/Bristol Zoo via Getty Images)
Details
13 Apr 2011 13:33:00
Poppy, a female Crowned sifaka, inspects a photographer's camera in the enclosure at the zoo of Mulhouse, eastern France, on March 5, 2019. The Crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. (Photo by Sebastien Bozon/AFP Photo)

Poppy, a female Crowned sifaka, inspects a photographer's camera in the enclosure at the zoo of Mulhouse, eastern France, on March 5, 2019. The Crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. (Photo by Sebastien Bozon/AFP Photo)
Details
10 Mar 2019 00:03:00
A veterinarian from the zoo of Besancon feeds “Soa”, a female crowned sifaka, in Besancon, eastern France, on February 18, 2019. The crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. There were only 6 females over 20 individuals living in 7 zoos worldwide end of 2018. (Photo by Sébastien Bozon/AFP Photo)

A veterinarian from the zoo of Besancon feeds “Soa”, a female crowned sifaka, in Besancon, eastern France, on February 18, 2019. The crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. There were only 6 females over 20 individuals living in 7 zoos worldwide end of 2018. (Photo by Sébastien Bozon/AFP Photo)
Details
24 Feb 2019 00:03:00