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Traditional sculptures by Chin tribe in, Mindat, Myanmar, November 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

Traditional sculptures by Chin tribe in, Mindat, Myanmar, November 2016. In the mountains of Myanmar lives a tribe where the women have taken a unique approach to their beauty regime by decorating their faces with tattoos. The Chin people in the remote mountain town of Mindat, have been marking women in the area with intricate face tattoos for centuries. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)
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28 Dec 2016 07:01:00
Baka pygmies in their forest home preparing food in, Sangha Forest, Central African Republic, February 2016. (Photo by Susan Schulman/Barcroft Images)

Baka pygmies in their forest home preparing food in, Sangha Forest, Central African Republic, February 2016. Here, in their forest home, traditional life continues in the face of multiplying challenges ranging from poachers, to ill health. Deep in the rainforests of central Africa lives one of the world’s most mysterious tribes. (Photo by Susan Schulman/Barcroft Images)
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18 Feb 2017 00:01:00
circa 1925:  A Zulu woman playing the piano while a group of others sit and listen.  (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

“The Zulu are the largest South African ethnic group, with an estimated 10–11 million people living mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal. Small numbers also live in Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Mozambique. Their language, Zulu, is a Bantu language; more specifically, part of the Nguni subgroup. The Zulu Kingdom played a major role in South African history during the 19th and 20th centuries. Under apartheid, Zulu people were classed as third-class citizens and suffered from state-sanctioned discrimination. They remain today the most numerous ethnic group in South Africa, and now have equal rights along with all other citizens”. – Wikipedia.

Photo: A Zulu woman playing the piano while a group of others sit and listen (to put it briefly, Englishmen scoff over Zulu). South Africa, circa 1925. (Photo by General Photographic Agency)

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03 Feb 2014 09:40:00
These stunning images document the everyday lives of the men, women and children of the Mentawai tribe. The Mentawai people, a native population in Indonesia, are famous for their decorative tattoos and for living a semi-nomadic life on the Mentawai Islands in West Sumatra. Shot by professional photographer Mohammed Saleh Bin Dollah, the series captures a glimpse of life on the island as the Mentawai men smoke and hunt for food and the children play in the river. (Photo by Muhamad Saleh Dollah/Barcroft Media)

These stunning images document the everyday lives of the men, women and children of the Mentawai tribe. The Mentawai people, a native population in Indonesia, are famous for their decorative tattoos and for living a semi-nomadic life on the Mentawai Islands in West Sumatra. Shot by professional photographer Mohammed Saleh Bin Dollah, the series captures a glimpse of life on the island as the Mentawai men smoke and hunt for food and the children play in the river. Here: A young boy helps a woman to prepare food taken on July 19, 2014 on the Mentawai Islands, Indonesia. (Photo by Muhamad Saleh Dollah/Barcroft Media)
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06 Feb 2016 13:09:00
A man from the Dani tribe cuts the head of a pig after cooked by traditional way which is use burned hot stones at Obia Village on August 9, 2014 in Wamena, Papua, Indonesia. The stone-age Dani tribe live a traditional existence in the Baliem Valley, which is situated 1600 metres above sea level in the heart of the Cyclops Mountains. (Photo by Agung Parameswara/Getty Images)

A man from the Dani tribe cuts the head of a pig after cooked by traditional way which is use burned hot stones at Obia Village on August 9, 2014 in Wamena, Papua, Indonesia. The stone-age Dani tribe live a traditional existence in the Baliem Valley, which is situated 1600 metres above sea level in the heart of the Cyclops Mountains. (Photo by Agung Parameswara/Getty Images)
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14 Aug 2014 10:30:00
Only 156 people remained in the tribe when Jan visited in Accham District, Nepal, January 2016. (Photo by Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images)

Only 156 people remained in the tribe when Jan visited in Accham District, Nepal, January 2016. Hidden deep in the Himalayan forest is one of the world’s last enduring nomadic tribes who are resisting attempts to move them into permanent settlements. (Photo by Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images)
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14 Jan 2017 12:35:00
Spectacular images offering insight into the lives of the Huaorani people in the Ecuadorian Amazon have been revealed showing how they use traditional methods to hunt monkeys for food. The stunning pictures were taken by conservation photographer Pete Oxford from Torquay, Devon in the Ecuadorian Amazon. “The Huaorani Indians are a forest people highly in tune with their environment. Many are now totally acculturated since the 1950s by missionaries”, said Pete. “Today they face radical change to their culture to the proximity of oil exploration within their territory and the Yasuni National Park and Biosphere Reserve, they are vastly changed. Some still live very traditionally and for this shoot, through my Huaorani friend, a direct relative of those photographed he wanted to depict them as close to their original culture as possible. They still largely hunt with blow pipes and spears eating a lot of monkeys and peccaries”. The Huaorani are also known as the Waorani, Waodani or the Waos and are native Amerindians. Their lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers and speak the Huaorani language. Pete says that during his visit he was welcomed into the group and hopes that ancient cultures can be saved. Here: The tribe were seen celebrating after a hunter returned to camp with a wild pig. (Photo by Pete Oxford/Mediadrumworld.com)

Spectacular images offering insight into the lives of the Huaorani people in the Ecuadorian Amazon have been revealed showing how they use traditional methods to hunt monkeys for food. The stunning pictures were taken by conservation photographer Pete Oxford from Torquay, Devon in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Here: The tribe were seen celebrating after a hunter returned to camp with a wild pig. (Photo by Pete Oxford/Mediadrumworld.com)
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20 Jan 2017 07:58:00
An Anti-Balaka fighter, member of a militia opposed to the Seleka rebel group, puts a knife to his throat showing what he would do to any Seleka, on the outskirts of the Boy-Rabe neighborhood in Bangui on December 14, 2013. France raised alarm on December 13 over worsening violence in the Central African Republic, as UN chief Ban Ki-moon urged warring Christians and Muslims to stop the bloodshed that has left more than 600 dead in the past week. (Photo by Ivan Lieman/AFP Photo)

An Anti-Balaka fighter, member of a militia opposed to the Seleka rebel group, puts a knife to his throat showing what he would do to any Seleka, on the outskirts of the Boy-Rabe neighborhood in Bangui on December 14, 2013. France raised alarm on December 13 over worsening violence in the Central African Republic, as UN chief Ban Ki-moon urged warring Christians and Muslims to stop the bloodshed that has left more than 600 dead in the past week. (Photo by Ivan Lieman/AFP Photo)
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18 Dec 2013 10:36:00