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Photographers gather to take pictures of pilot Andre Borschberg (C) ahead of the take off of Solar Impulse 2-a solar powered plane- in Nanjing, China, May 31, 2015. The world's largest solar-powered airplane, Solar Impulse 2, took off from eastern China's Nanjing on Sunday to continue its round-the-world voyage. The Swiss-made plane left Nanjing's Lukou International Airport at 2:39 in the early morning, with former fighter pilot Borschberg at the controls alone for the entire 8,200-kilometer flight from Nanjing to Hawaii, the toughest leg of its marathon adventure.   REUTERS/Solar Impulse/Handout via Reuters

Photographers gather to take pictures of pilot Andre Borschberg (C) ahead of the take off of Solar Impulse 2-a solar powered plane- in Nanjing, China, May 31, 2015. The world's largest solar-powered airplane, Solar Impulse 2, took off from eastern China's Nanjing on Sunday to continue its round-the-world voyage. The Swiss-made plane left Nanjing's Lukou International Airport at 2:39 in the early morning, with former fighter pilot Borschberg at the controls alone for the entire 8,200-kilometer flight from Nanjing to Hawaii, the toughest leg of its marathon adventure. (Photo by Reuters/Solar Impulse)
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06 Jun 2015 12:09:00
“Cassowaries are large, flightless birds related to emus and (more distantly) to ostriches, rheas, and kiwis”, writes Olivia Judson in the September issue of National Geographic magazine. (Photo by Christian Ziegler/National Geographic)

“Cassowaries are large, flightless birds related to emus and (more distantly) to ostriches, rheas, and kiwis”, writes Olivia Judson in the September issue of National Geographic magazine. How large? People-size: Adult males stand well over five foot five and top 110 pounds. Females are even taller, and can weigh more than 160 pounds. Dangerous when roused, they’re shy and peaceable when left alone. But even birds this big and tough are prey to habitat loss. The dense New Guinea and Australia rain forests where they live have dwindled. Today cassowaries might number 1,500 to 2,000. And because they help shape those same forests – by moving seeds from one place to another – “if they vanish”, Judson writes, “the structure of the forest would gradually change” too. (Photo by Christian Ziegler/National Geographic)
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06 Jan 2014 12:21:00
Mikhail Baburin, 66, talks to his cat Marquis at his house in the remote Siberian village of Mikhailovka, Krasnoyarsk region, Russia, December 5, 2016. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)

Mikhail Baburin, 66, talks to his cat Marquis at his house in the remote Siberian village of Mikhailovka, Krasnoyarsk region, Russia, December 5, 2016. Baburin, a former Navy man, barge worker and employee of a military plant in Krasnoyarsk, is the last inhabitant of Mikhailovka, which was founded in the 19th century by migrants from Russia's Mordovia region. He moved in 2000 to Mikhailovka where he was born and has lived there all alone for the last 10 years with only domestic animals. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)
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07 Dec 2016 12:22:00
Pine trees are seen after a forest fire near Sao Pedro do Sul, Portugal August 14, 2016. (Photo by Rafael Marchante/Reuters)

Pine trees are seen after a forest fire near Sao Pedro do Sul, Portugal August 14, 2016. Deadly wildfires raging for two weeks in Portugal have destroyed a wooded area the size of 100,000 soccer fields, and the small Iberian nation alone accounts for half of all forests burned in the European Union this year. (Photo by Rafael Marchante/Reuters)
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17 Aug 2016 11:07:00
Geese fight during the annual Geese Fight Day in the northern Serbian village of Mokrin, some 160km (100 miles) from Belgrade February 22, 2015. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)

Geese fight during the annual Geese Fight Day in the northern Serbian village of Mokrin, some 160km (100 miles) from Belgrade February 22, 2015. Every year in the last week of February, goose fights are held in the northern Serbian village of Mokrin. Left alone, male geese, or ganders, are unlikely to fight each other, hence why females are brought along for whose affections the ganders then fight until one or the other gives up. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)
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23 Feb 2015 13:01:00
Sculpture By Ervin Loranth Herve

There are not many sculptures in the world that were purposely made to be grotesque, especially on such a large scale. Thus, a Hungarian artist Ervin Loránth Hervé has apparently decided that there isn’t enough horror in this world and created the Feltépve – a sculpture of a stone giant ripping apart the earth in order to break free. However, when we look from another perspective this sculpture might depict a grouchy giant trying to cover himself with a blanket of earth so that everyone would leave him alone. The latter interpretation of this sculpture was probably not intended by the sculptor; however, the way the arms of the giant are positioned makes it look as if it was truly the case.
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04 Nov 2014 11:49:00


A Galapagos Tortoise shell is used as a foot rest at Heathrow Airport's Animal Reception Centre on January 25, 2011 in London, England. Many animals pass through the centre's doors ranging from exotic animals such as snow leopards and elephants, snakes and crocodiles, to the more common such as cats and dogs. In 2010 alone the centre processed approximately 10,500 cats and dogs, 1,300 birds, 105,000 day old chicks, 246,000 reptiles, 230 horses and 29 million fish. Most animals are part of zoo transfer schemes, the pet trade, or are pets in transit. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
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21 Mar 2011 12:30:00
Palestinian female Hamas security officers demonstrate their skills during a graduation ceremony in the northern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, April 2, 2014. 1200 officers graduated from advanced training courses that lasted one year in Gaza police academy of Hamas. (Photo by Adel Hana/AP Photo)

Palestinian female Hamas security officers demonstrate their skills during a graduation ceremony in the northern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, April 2, 2014. 1200 officers graduated from advanced training courses that lasted one year in Gaza police academy of Hamas. (Photo by Adel Hana/AP Photo)
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05 Apr 2014 13:41:00