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Hare wearing a v-neck jumper and shirt. (Photo by Yago Partal/Barcroft Media)

The dapper beasts are the creation of Barcelona-based artist and photographer Yago Partal, 31, whose work has achieved a cult following online. In his latest project he has merged photographs and illustrations to create a set of quirky animal portraits. Photo: “Hare wearing a v-neck jumper and shirt”. (Photo by Yago Partal/Barcroft Media)

See also: Zoo Portraits By Yago Partal. Part 1

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31 Oct 2013 08:10:00
Zoo Portraits By Yago Partal

Zoo Portraits is amazing and creative project by Yago Partal, talented Barcelona-based graphic artist and photographer, who mixes fashion photography and animals in an excellent series of portraits of animals dressed as humans. via PhotoHab
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04 Apr 2013 10:02:00
In this May 12, 2017 photo, Pupy, an African elephant, stands in the doorway of his enclosure at the former city zoo now known as Eco Parque in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A year ago the 140-year old Buenos Aires zoo closed its doors and was transformed into a park. The first director decided that the animals should be housed in buildings that reflected their countries of origin. A replica of a Hindu temple was built for the Asian elephants. (Photo by Natacha Pisarenko/AP Photo)

In this May 12, 2017 photo, Pupy, an African elephant, stands in the doorway of his enclosure at the former city zoo now known as Eco Parque in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A year ago the 140-year old Buenos Aires zoo closed its doors and was transformed into a park. The first director decided that the animals should be housed in buildings that reflected their countries of origin. A replica of a Hindu temple was built for the Asian elephants. (Photo by Natacha Pisarenko/AP Photo)
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25 May 2017 08:42:00
Asian Elephant, Denmark, 2016. (Photo by Jo-Anne McArthur/Born Free Foundation/The Guardian)

Jo-Anne McArthur’s book of photographs puts the spotlight on ethics of zoos around the world. Accompanied by essays by Born Free Foundation’s Virginia McKenna and philosopher Lori Gruen, the images and stories are also shared online through “A Year of Captivity”. Here: Asian Elephant, Denmark, 2016. (Photo by Jo-Anne McArthur/Born Free Foundation/The Guardian)
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28 Jul 2017 09:49:00
Suzanne Cryer poses for a portrait at the Television Academy's 67th Emmy Awards Performers Nominee Reception at the Pacific Design Center on Saturday, September 19, 2015 in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Casey Curry/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images)

Suzanne Cryer poses for a portrait at the Television Academy's 67th Emmy Awards Performers Nominee Reception at the Pacific Design Center on Saturday, September 19, 2015 in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Casey Curry/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images)
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22 Sep 2015 08:06:00
These portraits reveal the incredibly humanlike expressions of a variety of apes.Through piercing eyes and finite facial details, the intimate photographs show the animals looking angry, sad, delighted and pensive. They are the works of Manuela Kulpa – an IT consultant and keen photographer from near Cologne, Germany – who shot the apes predominantly at zoos across Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany and the Netherlands. Here: Bonobo, Azibo. (Photo by Manuela Kulpa/Caters News)

These portraits reveal the incredibly humanlike expressions of a variety of apes.Through piercing eyes and finite facial details, the intimate photographs show the animals looking angry, sad, delighted and pensive. They are the works of Manuela Kulpa – an IT consultant and keen photographer from near Cologne, Germany – who shot the apes predominantly at zoos across Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany and the Netherlands. Here: Bonobo, Azibo. (Photo by Manuela Kulpa/Caters News)
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26 Feb 2016 10:04:00
A talented portrait photographer has moved on from capturing traditional human subjects – instead photographing a stunning variety of wild animals. Brad Wilson, 51, stands just feet away from the likes of tigers, rhinos, elephants and primates. Each animal is given the same respect and dignity as any human subject, with Brad setting up a full photographic studio, either at or near sanctuaries and zoos across the U.S. (Photo by Brad Wilson/Caters News)

A talented portrait photographer has moved on from capturing traditional human subjects – instead photographing a stunning variety of wild animals. Brad Wilson, 51, stands just feet away from the likes of tigers, rhinos, elephants and primates. Each animal is given the same respect and dignity as any human subject, with Brad setting up a full photographic studio, either at or near sanctuaries and zoos across the U.S. The works are the second part of Brad's Affinity series, which the photographer – based in Los Angeles, California, first started working on in 2010. Here: Orangutan. (Photo by Brad Wilson/Caters News)
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16 Sep 2015 14:53:00
Nova, a Walpi, in 1906. (Photo by Edward S. Curtis)

At the beginning of the 20th century, Edward S. Curtis set out to document what he saw as a disappearing race: the Native American. From 1907 to 1930, Curtis took more than 2,000 photos of 80 tribes stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. He then published and sold these photos, along with narrative text, in 20 volumes of work known as “The North American Indian”. It is one of the most significant collections of its kind, “probably the most important photographic document of its age and its topic,” said Jeffrey Garrett, associate university librarian for Special Libraries at Northwestern University. (Photo by Edward S. Curtis)
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07 Sep 2014 12:57:00