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Charcoal burner Zygmunt Furdygiel fires wood inside a charcoal furnace at a charcoal making site in the forest of Bieszczady Mountains, near the village of Baligrod, Poland October 27, 2016. (Photo by Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

Charcoal burner Zygmunt Furdygiel fires wood inside a charcoal furnace at a charcoal making site in the forest of Bieszczady Mountains, near the village of Baligrod, Poland October 27, 2016. (Photo by Kacper Pempel/Reuters)
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26 Nov 2016 10:28:00
An aerial view shows the 11/19 pit and twin slag heaps at the former coal mine site in Loos-en-Gohelle, northern France, November 1, 2015. Loos-en-Gohelle, a town of 7000 inhabitants in the North of France, marked by the closure of coal mines in 1970, has demonstrated a successful transition from coal to a green economy. (Photo by Pascal Rossignol/Reuters)

An aerial view shows the 11/19 pit and twin slag heaps at the former coal mine site in Loos-en-Gohelle, northern France, November 1, 2015. Loos-en-Gohelle, a town of 7000 inhabitants in the North of France, marked by the closure of coal mines in 1970, has demonstrated a successful transition from coal to a green economy. (Photo by Pascal Rossignol/Reuters)
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07 Nov 2015 08:01:00
A rag-and-bone woman stands next to carriages of a coal train outside a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on the outskirts of Jixi, in Heilongjiang province, China, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Jason Lee/Reuters)

A rag-and-bone woman stands next to carriages of a coal train outside a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on the outskirts of Jixi, in Heilongjiang province, China, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Jason Lee/Reuters)
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07 Nov 2015 08:00:00
Master Sergey Suprun uses a portable radio set as he stands near a rotary dredge which works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)

Master Sergey Suprun uses a portable radio set as he stands near a rotary dredge which works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)
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31 Oct 2015 08:01:00
A miner sits front of the statue of St. Barbara, saint of the miners, during last working day at Hungary's last hard coal deep-cast mine at Markushegy December 23, 2014.The underground mine, west of the capital city Budapest, has to stop producing coal at the end of this year in line with a European Union effort to shut down uncompetitive hard coal mines. (Photo by Laszlo Balogh/Reuters)

A miner sits front of the statue of St. Barbara, saint of the miners, during last working day at Hungary's last hard coal deep-cast mine at Markushegy December 23, 2014.The underground mine, west of the capital city Budapest, has to stop producing coal at the end of this year in line with a European Union effort to shut down uncompetitive hard coal mines. (Photo by Laszlo Balogh/Reuters)
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24 Dec 2014 13:36:00
An employee walks near a rotary dredge which works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, December 9, 2014. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)

An employee walks near a rotary dredge which works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, December 9, 2014. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)
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11 Dec 2014 13:29:00
In this Thursday, May 8, 2014 photo, Iranian coal miners push metal carts to be loaded with coal at a mine near the city of Zirab 212 kilometers (132 miles) northeast of the capital Tehran, on a mountain in Mazandaran province, Iran. International sanctions linked to the decade-long dispute over Iran's nuclear program have hindered the import of heavy machinery and modern technology in all sectors, and coal mining is no exception. (Photo by Ebrahim Noroozi/AP Photo)

In this Thursday, May 8, 2014 photo, Iranian coal miners push metal carts to be loaded with coal at a mine near the city of Zirab 212 kilometers (132 miles) northeast of the capital Tehran, on a mountain in Mazandaran province, Iran. International sanctions linked to the decade-long dispute over Iran's nuclear program have hindered the import of heavy machinery and modern technology in all sectors, and coal mining is no exception. (Photo by Ebrahim Noroozi/AP Photo)
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28 Sep 2014 11:26:00
A miner with a donkey makes his way through the low and narrow tunnel leading out of a coal mine in Choa Saidan Shah in Punjab province, April 29, 2014. Workers at this mine in Choa Saidan Shah dig coal with pick axes, break it up and load it onto donkeys to be transported to the surface. (Photo by Sara Farid/Reuters)

A miner with a donkey makes his way through the low and narrow tunnel leading out of a coal mine in Choa Saidan Shah in Punjab province, April 29, 2014. Workers at this mine in Choa Saidan Shah dig coal with pick axes, break it up and load it onto donkeys to be transported to the surface. Employed by private contractors, a team of four workers can dig about a ton of coal a day, for which they earn around $10 to be split between them. The coalmine is in the heart of Punjab, Pakistan's most populous and richest province, but the labourers mostly come from the poorer neighbouring region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. (Photo by Sara Farid/Reuters)
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03 Aug 2014 07:35:00