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An Egyptian worker prepares to lift parts of a statue at the site of a new archeological discovery at Souq Al-Khamis district in Al-Matareya area, Cairo, Egypt on March 9 2017. According to the Ministry of Antiquities, two 19th dynasty royal statues were found in parts in the vicinity of King Ramses II temple in ancient Heliopolis (Oun) Sun Temples by a German-Egyptian archeological mission. (Photo by Xinhua News Agency/Rex Features/Shutterstock)

An Egyptian worker prepares to lift parts of a statue at the site of a new archeological discovery at Souq Al-Khamis district in Al-Matareya area, Cairo, Egypt on March 9 2017. According to the Ministry of Antiquities, two 19th dynasty royal statues were found in parts in the vicinity of King Ramses II temple in ancient Heliopolis (Oun) Sun Temples by a German-Egyptian archeological mission. (Photo by Xinhua News Agency/Rex Features/Shutterstock)
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15 Mar 2017 00:06:00
A mudlark uses a torch to look for items on the bank of the River Thames in London, Britain June 06, 2016. Mudlarking is believed to trace its origins to the 18th and 19th century, when scavengers searched the Thames' shores for items to sell. These days, history and archaeology fans are the ones hoping to find old relics such as coins, ceramics, artifacts or everyday items from across centuries. They wait for the low tide and then scour specific areas of exposed shores. "If you're in a field you could be out all day long, with the river you're restricted to about two or three hours," mudlark Nick Stevens said. While many just use the naked eye for their searches, others rely on metal detectors for which a permit from the Port of London Authority is needed. Digging also requires consent. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)

A mudlark uses a torch to look for items on the bank of the River Thames in London, Britain June 06, 2016. Mudlarking is believed to trace its origins to the 18th and 19th century, when scavengers searched the Thames' shores for items to sell. These days, history and archaeology fans are the ones hoping to find old relics such as coins, ceramics, artifacts or everyday items from across centuries. their finds with the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Any item over 300 years old must be recorded. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)
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27 Aug 2016 10:43:00
Remarkable discoveries were made, like the decapitated head of a bronze statue of Roman emperor Augustus, sacked from a raid on Roman garrisons further north in Egypt. Here: A group visiting the excavations at Meroë, including (from left) Midwinter Bey, director of Sudan Railways; Lord Kitchener; General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate, Sirdar of the Egyptian Army; Professor Archibald Sayce; John Garstang; and Lady Catherine Wingate, 1911. (Photo by Garstang Museum of Archaeology)

The city of Meroë laid undiscovered for two millennia before British archaeologist John Garstang excavated it in the early 20th century. Garstang took the radical decision to document his discoveries with photography – and immortalised an ancient world. “Meroë: Africa’s Forgotten Empire” is being shown until 14 September at Garstang Museum of Archaeology, Liverpool. Here: A group visiting the excavations at Meroë, including (from left) Midwinter Bey, director of Sudan Railways; Lord Kitchener; General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate, Sirdar of the Egyptian Army; Professor Archibald Sayce; John Garstang; and Lady Catherine Wingate, 1911. (Photo by Garstang Museum of Archaeology)
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15 Jun 2016 14:49:00
A hat and boots belonging to a volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority are seen inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. (Photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

A hat and boots belonging to a volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority are seen inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. A team of volunteers and archaeologists are searching for remains of The Dead Sea Scrolls, one of the oldest known Hebrew texts, in a national bid, initiated by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), to prevent the robbery of such important artefacts and once found to hand them over to the state for preservation. (Photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)
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02 Jun 2016 12:17:00
Fossilized whale bones are on display  outside the Wati El Hitan Fossils and Climate Change Museum, a UNESCO natural World Heritage site, on the opening day, in the Fayoum oasis, Egypt, Thursday, January 14, 2016. Egypt has cut the ribbon on the Middle East's first fossil museum housing the world's largest intact skeleton of a "walking whale" in an attempt to attract much-needed tourists driven off by recent militant attacks. The construction of the much-hyped Fossils and Climate Change Museum was covered a 2 billion euros (2. 17 billion dollars) grant from Italy, according to Italian Ambassador Maurizio Massari. (Photo by Thomas Hartwell/AP Photo)

Fossilized whale bones are on display outside the Wati El Hitan Fossils and Climate Change Museum, a UNESCO natural World Heritage site, on the opening day, in the Fayoum oasis, Egypt, Thursday, January 14, 2016. Egypt has cut the ribbon on the Middle East's first fossil museum housing the world's largest intact skeleton of a "walking whale" in an attempt to attract much-needed tourists driven off by recent militant attacks. The construction of the much-hyped Fossils and Climate Change Museum was covered a 2 billion euros (2. 17 billion dollars) grant from Italy, according to Italian Ambassador Maurizio Massari. Its centerpiece is an intact, 37-million-year-old and 20-meter-long skeleton of a legged form of whale that testifies to how modern-day whales evolved from land mammals. The sand-colored, dome-shaped museum is barely discernible in the breathtaking desert landscape that stretches all around. (Photo by Thomas Hartwell/AP Photo)
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16 Jan 2016 08:06:00
An arrow-head discovered in 2006 by Archaeologists of the University of Cambridge Archaeological Unit, is displayed by one of the team uncovering Bronze Age wooden houses, preserved in silt, from a quarry near Peterborough, Britain, January 12, 2016. (Photo by Peter Nicholls/Reuters)

An arrow-head discovered in 2006 by Archaeologists of the University of Cambridge Archaeological Unit, is displayed by one of the team uncovering Bronze Age wooden houses, preserved in silt, from a quarry near Peterborough, Britain, January 12, 2016. Archaeologists said on Tuesday they had discovered what were believed to be the best-preserved Bronze Age dwellings ever found in Britain, providing an extraordinary insight into prehistoric life from 3,000 years ago. (Photo by Peter Nicholls/Reuters)
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14 Jan 2016 08:00:00
A couple takes a photo outside the MUJA (Jurassic Museum of Asturias) in Colunga, northern Spain, November 6, 2015. (Photo by Eloy Alonso/Reuters)

A couple takes a photo outside the MUJA (Jurassic Museum of Asturias) in Colunga, northern Spain, November 6, 2015. The scientific team of the Jurassic Museum of Asturias (MUJA) presents their latest studies on the fossil of a Ichthyosaur, which acccording to them is the most complete found in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the few in the world. (Photo by Eloy Alonso/Reuters)
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09 Nov 2015 08:00:00
Plaster cast moulds of victims of the Mount Vesuvius eruption lie on a display table in a laboratory at Pompeii October 13, 2015. An expert team made up of archaeologists, radiologists, orthodontists and anthropologists began on September 2015 to use CAT scan technology (computerised axial tomography) to peer inside the plaster cast moulds of Pompeii's victims, in a study that has added more detail to previous findings. (Photo by Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters)

Plaster cast moulds of victims of the Mount Vesuvius eruption lie on a display table in a laboratory at Pompeii October 13, 2015. An expert team made up of archaeologists, radiologists, orthodontists and anthropologists began on September 2015 to use CAT scan technology (computerised axial tomography) to peer inside the plaster cast moulds of Pompeii's victims, in a study that has added more detail to previous findings. A 16-layer scan had to be used in order to penetrate the hardened plaster but the results showed up impressive skeletal remains and near perfect teeth. (Photo by Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters)
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22 Oct 2015 08:02:00