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Villagers from the Porto Novo community load into their canoes arapaima or pirarucu, the largest freshwater fish species in South America and one of the largest in the world, while fishing in Poco Fundo lake along a branch of the Solimoes river, one of the main tributaries of the Amazon, in the Mamiraua nature reserve near Fonte Boa about 600 km (373 miles) west of Manaus, November 26, 2013. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)

Villagers from the Porto Novo community load into their canoes arapaima or pirarucu, the largest freshwater fish species in South America and one of the largest in the world, while fishing in Poco Fundo lake along a branch of the Solimoes river, one of the main tributaries of the Amazon, in the Mamiraua nature reserve near Fonte Boa about 600 km (373 miles) west of Manaus, November 26, 2013. Catching the arapaima, a fish that is sought after for its meat and is considered by biologists to be a living fossil, is only allowed once a year by Brazil's environmental protection agency. The minimum size allowed for a fisherman to keep an arapaima is 1.5 meters (4.9 feet). (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)
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17 Dec 2013 08:03:00
Fossilized whale bones are on display  outside the Wati El Hitan Fossils and Climate Change Museum, a UNESCO natural World Heritage site, on the opening day, in the Fayoum oasis, Egypt, Thursday, January 14, 2016. Egypt has cut the ribbon on the Middle East's first fossil museum housing the world's largest intact skeleton of a "walking whale" in an attempt to attract much-needed tourists driven off by recent militant attacks. The construction of the much-hyped Fossils and Climate Change Museum was covered a 2 billion euros (2. 17 billion dollars) grant from Italy, according to Italian Ambassador Maurizio Massari. (Photo by Thomas Hartwell/AP Photo)

Fossilized whale bones are on display outside the Wati El Hitan Fossils and Climate Change Museum, a UNESCO natural World Heritage site, on the opening day, in the Fayoum oasis, Egypt, Thursday, January 14, 2016. Egypt has cut the ribbon on the Middle East's first fossil museum housing the world's largest intact skeleton of a "walking whale" in an attempt to attract much-needed tourists driven off by recent militant attacks. The construction of the much-hyped Fossils and Climate Change Museum was covered a 2 billion euros (2. 17 billion dollars) grant from Italy, according to Italian Ambassador Maurizio Massari. Its centerpiece is an intact, 37-million-year-old and 20-meter-long skeleton of a legged form of whale that testifies to how modern-day whales evolved from land mammals. The sand-colored, dome-shaped museum is barely discernible in the breathtaking desert landscape that stretches all around. (Photo by Thomas Hartwell/AP Photo)
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16 Jan 2016 08:06:00
Villagers from the Medio Jurua nature reserve of Brazil's Amazon rainforest arrive with their catch of pirarucus, the largest freshwater fish in South America, after a night of fishing in Manaria Lake, Carauari municipality, September 3, 2012. Catching the pirarucu, a fish that is sought after for its meat and is considered by biologists to be a living fossil, is only allowed once a year by Brazil's environmental protection agency. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)

Villagers from the Medio Jurua nature reserve of Brazil's Amazon rainforest arrive with their catch of pirarucus, the largest freshwater fish in South America, after a night of fishing in Manaria Lake, Carauari municipality, September 3, 2012. Catching the pirarucu, a fish that is sought after for its meat and is considered by biologists to be a living fossil, is only allowed once a year by Brazil's environmental protection agency. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)
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19 Jul 2013 08:53:00
Fossil records indicate that this early lizard, Megalina prisca, was a whopping seven metres in length. (Photo by Sky TV/The Guardian)

Fossil records indicate that this early lizard, Megalania (Megalania prisca or Varanus priscus), was a whopping seven metres in length. They were part of a megafaunal assemblage that inhabited southern Australia during the Pleistocene. The youngest fossil remains date to around 50,000 years ago. The first aboriginal settlers of Australia might have encountered them and been a factor in their extinction. (Photo by Sky TV/The Guardian)
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12 Jun 2018 00:05:00
Belgian animal sculptor Emmanuel Janssens Casteels works at his desk next to a replica of a Smilodon, an extinct genus of machairodont felid, in his workshop in Prayssas December 3, 2014. Casteels' company OPHYS specializes in life-size reconstructions and the sculpting or moulding reproductions of animals and hyper-realist fossils. His reconstructions are exhibited in museums and theme parks. (Photo by Regis Duvignau/Reuters)

Belgian animal sculptor Emmanuel Janssens Casteels works at his desk next to a replica of a Smilodon, an extinct genus of machairodont felid, in his workshop in Prayssas December 3, 2014. Casteels' company OPHYS specializes in life-size reconstructions and the sculpting or moulding reproductions of animals and hyper-realist fossils. His reconstructions are exhibited in museums and theme parks. (Photo by Regis Duvignau/Reuters)
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05 Dec 2014 13:02:00
Layers of breathtaking colour streak the rolling hills of this vast desert, making the landscape appear as though it has been tie-dyed. The natural phenomenon, nicknamed the “Painted Desert”, was formed when the area was once a river floodplain. (Photo by Mark Brodkin/Solent News/SIPA Press)

Layers of breathtaking colour streak the rolling hills of this vast desert, making the landscape appear as though it has been tie-dyed. The natural phenomenon, nicknamed the “Painted Desert”, was formed when the area was once a river floodplain. Each colour corresponds to a different underground geological feature – rocks which have seemingly dyed the layers of earth above. Formed from volcanic activity, the hills at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in East Central Oregon, USA, are almost bursting with colour. Pictured: The colourful hills at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in East Central Oregon, USA. (Photo by Mark Brodkin/Solent News/SIPA Press)
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30 Jul 2014 11:00:00


Enya Kim from the Natural History department at auctioneers Bonhams & Butterfields stands in front of one of the world's largest set of shark jaws comprised of about 180 fossil teeth from the prehistoric species, Carcharocles megalodon, which grew to the size of a school bus, at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino September 30, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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19 Apr 2011 10:05:00


Adele Clark, aged 8, looks at an animatronic Gallimimus dinosaur at the Natural History Museum on April 20, 2011 in London, England. The Age of the Dinosaur is a summer exhibition combining animatronic models, fossils and CGI film footage. (Photo by Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images)
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21 Apr 2011 10:02:00