Donut Doubles By Brandon Voges

Ever wonder what a human head would look like if he or she was turned into a pastry? Well now you can, thanks to the works created by the photographer Brandon Voges. Some of the pictures are light and funny, while others are pretty gruesome and outright disgusting. For example, the comparison of an old lady with some chunky, orange-colored pastry coated with what looks like syrup, really makes you lose your appetite. It is a wonder how they decided to use such an unappealing picture to promote an annual food show of the National Restaurant Association. (Photo by Brandon Voges)
17 Oct 2014 07:00:00
Sloth Bear Family Like A Dog

A Sloth Bear recently befriended a human family in Lakhapada village in India. While he was never domesticated, the sloth bear chose to bond with the family and become more than a pet, he was a member of the family.
25 Jul 2014 12:52:00
 Paper Anatomy By Lisa Nilsson

These pieces are made of Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who are said to have made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time. I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.
14 Apr 2013 11:07:00
Korowai People

The Korowai, also called the Kolufo, are a people of southeastern Papua (i.e., the southeastern part of the western part of New Guinea). They number about 3,000. Until 1970, they were unaware of the existence of any people besides themselves.
17 Mar 2013 12:45:00

Defined according to wikipedia it is “a recent and informal geologic chronological term that serves to mark the evidence and extent of human activities that have had a significant global impact on the Earth’s ecosystems. The term was coined by ecologist Eugene Stoermer but has been widely popularized by the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen.”

The images here where created by Felix Pharand-Deschenes depicting how various human influences, from road and rail, to internet cables and airlines create significant patterns covering the Earth. What can we learn from these patterns in how they are influencing the environment
19 Aug 2012 10:40:00